selfsameness


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self·same

 (sĕlf′sām′)
adj.
Being the very same; identical.

self′same′ness n.

selfsameness

(ˈsɛlfˌseɪmnəs)
n
the quality or state of being selfsame or identical
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.selfsameness - the quality of being identical with itself
identicalness, indistinguishability, identity - exact sameness; "they shared an identity of interests"

selfsameness

noun
The quality or condition of being exactly the same as something else:
References in periodicals archive ?
The very word existentialism, beginning with the prefix ex ('out' or 'out of') aligns it with existence exile, exodus, exit, exteriority; these words 'bear a meaning that is not negative' (Blanchot, 1993: p 127), a meaning that challenges the sedentary predilection of the philosophical tradition for home, identity, and selfsameness. It questions the centrality of the established polis in favour of a cosmopolitan community; it challenges a paradigm of homesickness that places the refugee and the exile in the 'inferior position of the supplicant' (Viriasova, 2016: p 222).
This "grouping" itself can be problematic: such groupings must be "of such selfsameness as to make the averaging of the costs of dealing with the group a valid and reasonable indicium of the cost of dealing with any specific group member." (50) Again, with the help of economists, this is hardly an impossible undertaking.
(83) As such, identity is no longer seen in academic circles in the way Erik Erikson earlier proposed: 'The term "identity" expresses such a mutual relation in that it connotes both a persistent sameness within oneself (selfsameness) and a persistent sharing of some kind of essential characteristics with others.' (84) Yet while postmodern approaches link identity to concepts such as hybridity and multiplicity, individuals tend to experience identity as a unitary entity.
For instance, in "How to Look at Television," Adorno argued that "The repetitiveness, the selfsameness, and the ubiquity of modem mass culture tend to make for automated reactions and to weaken the forces of individual reaction" (p.
In that case we may speak about temporal selfsameness, understood as conflation of the narrating and the narrated, which thematically and symbolically correlates with the spatial selfsameness: the room that the narrator never leaves for the duration of the narrative.