semblative

semblative

(ˈsɛmblətɪv)
adj
obsolete resembling
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
(15) By advocating a temperance at times disturbingly more semblative of willful ignorance than informed abstinence, Raphael's pedagogical method, one that subtly but markedly rewrites the knowledge-as-food trope, casually yet significantly disturbs the delicate balance found throughout Areopagitica by frequently capitulating to an unwarranted--and, indeed, potentially damaging--scrupulosity.
(10) Dympna Callaghan's view that theatrical apprentices were more visibly susceptible to exploitation than apprentices in other trades is based on one particular of private, not public, theatre practice--the (limited) malpractice of press-ganging boys for one of the companies--and on the well-known Puritan intimations of sexual impropriety in the theatre, which lack candour as well as disinterestedness: Callaghan, '"And all is semblative a woman's part": Body Politics and Twelfth Night', in New Casebooks: Twelfth Night, ed.
Conversely, in both instances, there are also strong undercurrents of homosexual passion: Olivia may be said to be seduced by the submerged femininity of Cesario, while Orsino is clearly excited by the androgynous qualities of the adolescent and the combined gendered states "he" embodies: "Diana's lip / Is not more smooth and rubious; thy small pipe / Is as the maiden's organ, shrill and sound, / And all is semblative a woman's part" (1.4.31-34).
Diana's lip Is not more smooth and rubious; thy small pipe Is as the maiden's organ, shrill and sound, And all is semblative a woman's part.
"'And all is semblative a woman's part': body politics and Twelfth Night." Textual Practice 7 (1993): 428-52.
The androgynous beauty of the Elizabethan boy-actor, whose every external sign was "semblative a woman's part" (Shakespeare, Twelfth Night 1.4, 33), elicited erotic passion (144) in members of the audience, both male and female, in much the same way that the ambiguously gendered Viola/Cesaric in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night evoked in his/her coplayers diverse erotic phantasies (145) before ultimately becoming "Orsino's mistress and his fancy's queen" (TN 5.1, 365).
Perhaps one of the most unusual features of the conjunct/disjunct system in Awa Pit is the use of the system on words that are not, by other criteria, verbs: the negative particle shi, the semblative postposition kana, and the question markers sa and ki.