semi-invalid

semi-invalid

n
a person who is partially disabled or somewhat infirm
References in periodicals archive ?
Although only 37 when she came to the throne, she was a semi-invalid because her many pregnancies wrecked her health.
"Rochester is now a crippled man, and a blind man, and she still is determined, and they do get together, despite his moral objections to her taking him on as a semi-invalid. There's a little bit of tension, there."
| John Lane started to paint a year ago at the age of 83 and under the brilliant teacher Philip WatKin, his retirement pastime is, he says, now a semi-invalid's delight.
A local source, who did not want to be named, said: "Norman's motherin-law was a semi-invalid and her daughter Shauna had moved back from South Africa to look after her.
The film also included the cautionary tale of Goddess Patty, weighing 44 stone, who is too heavy to walk alone and a semi-invalid.
The programme also features 44st Patty, who has become a semi-invalid and requires constant care from her son.
The story of first lady Helen Herron "Nellie" Taft (1861-1943) is in part a "what if' tale, for a stroke in May 1909 impaired her speech, interrupted her White House agenda, and rendered her a semi-invalid for the duration of her husband's four years as president.
McCalman reveals Darwin as far more than the semi-invalid who rarely strayed from his country house in Kent and allowed Huxley to direct the campaign.
Fujinami, who was 75 when executed, also protested to the justice minister, saying in the last part of his note, ''I am a semi-invalid, as I cannot stand or walk by myself.''
I am 89, semi-invalid and my wife has had a stroke and is 85 years old.