semicolonialism

semicolonialism

(ˌsɛmɪkəˈləʊnɪəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the state of being semicolonial
References in periodicals archive ?
'Eugenic woman, semicolonialism, and colonial modernity as problems for postcolonial theory'.
The very experience of Japanese colonialism or semicolonialism during the "modernization" process left deep scars across Asia, and the politics of memory still profoundly influences Northeast Asian regional politics in a way that contributes to excessive securitization and hinders economic cooperation.
For an insightful analysis of the nature of "semicolonialism" in early twentieth-century China, see SHU-MEI SHIH, THE LURE OF THE MODERN: WRITING MODERNISM IN SEMICOLONIAL CHINA, 1917-1937 (2001).
The distinction between colonialism and semicolonialism parallels the distinction between totalitarianism and authoritarianism that is common in political science.
Already in the 1950s, the youthful author directed his attention to the interlocking forces of sex, politics, and power in order to represent the plight of the youths of his generation, mired in what he perceived to be a debilitating passivity under the weight of the American Occupation (1945-52), a condition akin to semicolonialism. While the Occupation had, on the one hand, liberated the Japanese people from the most onerous facets of its government's prewar and wartime policies, it had, on the other, brought its own brand of authoritarian power that cowered the population.
Chinese Modernity and the Peasant Path: Semicolonialism in the Northern Yangzi Delta, by Kathy Le Mons Walker.