semidivine

sem·i·di·vine

 (sĕm′ē-dĭ-vīn′, sĕm′ī-)
adj.
Not fully divine but more than mortal, as a demigod in Greek mythology.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

semidivine

(ˌsɛmɪdɪˈvaɪn)
adj
(Classical Myth & Legend) more than mortal but not completely divine, like a demigod in Greek mythology
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
According to Katherine, the narrator of Catherine Chung's new novel, the 10th muse was the youngest of the semidivine sisters and chose to tell her own stories rather than be a source of inspiration for men.
This "taming" (defanging) is given an extreme manifestation in Meyer's Twilight series, in which Edward, Bella's vampire love interest, is described in terms of the angelic and the semidivine as opposed to the traditional demonic.
In each jataka, the Buddha is reborn in a variety of animal, human and semidivine forms, perfecting a virtue he will need in order to reach enlightenment.
After the whistle the press were coralled in a downstairs press room so as not to gaze upon him as he swept down the tunnel and into the Boro changies to deliver a semidivine well done message.
The co-optation of women into sexual yoga and the introduction of divine and semidivine females into a male-dominated textual and iconographic tradition had little impact on the lives of actual women, especially when the majority of Tibetan Buddhist women, including Sera Khandro, believed--and continue to believe--that they must reincarnate as men in order to attain enlightenment.
Informed by primary and secondary sources, Boyarin presents a balanced synopsis of canonical and noncanonical Jewish texts that interpret and meditate on divine and semidivine beings (forces) withill the streams of first-century Judaism and which relate distinctively to the Johanine, Pauline, and Synoptic Jesus.
Herbert's mythical protagonists are not presented as semidivine figures but as very human in their reactions.
The shift marks a turn from authority to reciprocity, from trickery to friendship, or from divinity to humanity--although via a semidivine apparition.
A Thern, as you doubtless know, belongs to a priestly class of semidivine immortals who live on Mars and elsewhere, meddling in mortal affairs, as gods are wont to do.
The Epic plays constantly on boundaries such as those between men and gods, humans and animals, man and woman, man and man, life and death, constructing "queer" relationships and transgressions of categories and involving liminal characters quite far from the average citizen: the semidivine Gilgames, the bestial Enkidu, the goddess Istar.
The peace treaty comes almost leisurely; it is actually Amphitheos, a semidivine figure that brings the spondai for Dikaiopolis.
Third, like the Short Course, the Filippov text is essentially an institutional history which casts its central dramatis persana as the personification of executive power rather than as the three-dimensional, semidivine object of a conventional personality cult.