semilethal


Also found in: Medical.

semilethal

(ˌsɛmɪˈliːθəl) genetics
n
a semilethal gene
adj
(of a mutant gene) lethal or causing harm to more than half, but not all, of homozygous individuals
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References in periodicals archive ?
Drug-resistant bacteria can be effectively eliminated by PDT [14] and there are no reports of microbes becoming resistant to PDT despite numerous attempts to induce resistance by repeated cycles of semilethal PDT and microbial regrowth [15].
Here, we have established that OPN has a protective role in a model of semilethal WNV infection, especially during acute and postacute time points.
According to the liquid chlorine concentration, the affected areas can be divided into lethal circle (3000 x [10.sup.-6]), semilethal circle (300 x [10.sup.-6] ~ 3000 x [10.sup.-6]), and injury circle (30 x [10.sup.-6] ~ 300 x [10.sup.-6]) whichwill lead to death, disability, and injury, respectively.
The [Ubx.sup.CPTI000601] line is semilethal as a homozygote, with some flies surviving to adulthood.
Although no genetic studies have been performed, it seems likely that the green morphs carried a semilethal gene.
Kyphomelic dysplasia: a rare form of semilethal skeletal dysplasia.
The most plausible reason for this deficit of variegated-seeded plants could be the semilethal action of the b1 locus (Tammes, 1928; Shaw et al., 1931; Myers, 1936).
Information about reduced fertility, and perhaps semilethal effects associated with hairless mutations, were discussed by Sinclair et al.
The nonlethal t haplotypes typically show a reduction in the viability of homozygous t/t embryos ranging between 10% and 90%, and are thus known as the "semilethal" t haplotypes.