semimonastic

semimonastic

(ˌsɛmɪməˈnæstɪk)
adj
(Christian Churches, other) somewhat monastic; monastic in certain respects
References in periodicals archive ?
St Joseph's College, which first welcomed pupils to its 153-acre semimonastic environment in 1883, was run by a board of trustees headed by the Archbishop of Liverpool.
Live a semimonastic life, suggested Chief Justice Maria Lourdes Sereno to fellow justices and judges, during her annual Meet the Press forum yesterday.
John Musinsky, our novice master (who later, 1967-77, would serve as SVD superior general), that we were to be "apostolic religious missionaries, not monks." Nevertheless, we lived a semimonastic life in which conversation was allowed only three hours a day.
Mary Snyders was a Beguine (a semimonastic woman who lived in the community and was devoted to good works), and the painting had been commissioned to hang above her tomb in the Begijnhof church in Antwerp.
Whereas the presbyters and elders of the apostolic era had studiously avoided any resemblance to the pagan or Jewish priest - according to Bokenkotter, they centered their ministry on preaching the Word rather than celebrating sacraments - some of their successors in the early Middle Ages saw themselves in a different, semimonastic role.
Thus Gregory favored the institution of the canons regular, clerics and priests living a semimonastic life whose finality was the service of the faithful.
In 1921 he retired into semimonastic seclusion at Saint Benoit-sur-Loire.
He founded a semimonastic school of philosophy in Crotona, Italy, where he apparently practiced divination, among other arts.
Had it not been for the Big D, I probably wouldn't have had the chance to live in a shelter for the homeless when I ran away from home; I probably wouldn't have joined a templestaycumstudy program which involved living a semimonastic life for two months; I probably wouldn't have learned Zen meditation.
The seventh-century Statutes of the School of Nisibis brings out the semimonastic nature of the institution, and to some degree the integration of scholastic and monastic aspects in the transmission of learning going on in Nisibis.
Though religious life as lived in monastic communities (such as the Cistercians and Carmelites) and in new kinds of communities "in the world" (such as the Little Brothers and Sisters of Charles de Foucauld) survives as "special calls," the days of numerically large missionary and religious communities founded in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries for specific tasks appear to be numbered unless there is a strong, shared commitment on the part of members to a hardy contemplative and semimonastic dimension.
As a tool for this purpose we established a fraternity among Lutheran missionaries and pastors that received its impulses from semimonastic evangelical communities in Europe, such as Taize.