semiology

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se·mi·ol·o·gy

also se·mei·ol·o·gy  (sē′mē-ŏl′ə-jē, sĕm′ē-, sē′mī-)
n.
1.
a. The science that deals with signs or sign language.
b. The use of signs in signaling, as with a semaphore.
2. Symptomatology.

[Greek sēmeion, sign; see semiotic + -logy.]

se′mi·ol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

semiology

(ˌsɛmɪˈɒlədʒɪ; ˌsiːmɪ-) or

semeiology

n
(Linguistics) another word for semiotics
[C17 (in the sense 'sign language'): from Greek sēmeion sign + -logy]
semiologic, ˌsemioˈlogical, ˌsemeioˈlogic, ˌsemeioˈlogical adj
ˌsemiˈologist, ˌsemeiˈologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

se•mi•ol•o•gy

(ˌsi miˈɒl ə dʒi, ˌsɛm i-, ˌsi maɪ-)

n.
the study of signs and symbols; semiotics.
[1885–90; < Greek sēmeî(on) sign]
se`mi•o•log′ic (-əˈlɒdʒ ɪk) se`mi•o•log′i•cal, adj.
se`mi•ol′o•gist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

semeiology, semiology, semology

the study or science of signs; semantics. — semeiologist, semiologist, n. — semeiologic, semiologic, semeiological, semiological, adj.
See also: Linguistics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

semiology

The study of signs, symbols, and signals.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.semiology - (philosophy) a philosophical theory of the functions of signs and symbols
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

semiology

[ˌsemɪˈɒlədʒɪ] Nsemiología f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

semiology

[ˌsɛmɪˈɒlədʒɪ] nsemiologia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Lacan, along with numerous linguists and semiologists, argued that language is key in the development of individual identity, bridging the imaginary period with the symbolic.
On the other, anti-auteurist semiologists were drawn to very different French writers, and tended to hive off the making of theories from criticism, which was denounced as belles-lettristic, merely subjective, impressionism.
In general, going beyond the specific case under discussion here, there are hidden assertions in the media text which lead us to such evaluations, which allow themselves to be influenced by those assertions in the dialectic of meanings which the semiologists refer to as 'modality markers' (75).
In L'Anti-CEdipe, their first work together, they attacked the "poor technicians of desire--psychoanalysts and semiologists of every sign and symptom," as Foucault (1977: xiv) put it in the preface to the English edition of the book.
the young Marxist critics and semiologists of the Tel Quel group', of whom Goux was one of the leading figures.
They are connected in a variety of different ways and relations of dominance, and it is our job to decipher or decode, as the semiologists say, these connections.
At present, political communication has become a privileged, interdisciplinary field in which semiologists, anthropologists, rhetoric, linguists collaborate with political analysts, PR officers, communication counselors in order to establish, to manage, and to disseminate "the political reality", "the political game" (2).
A favourite wheeze of semiologists everywhere - a serving suggestion got up as an exercise in first order signification.