semiotics


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se·mi·ot·ics

also se·mei·ot·ics  (sē′mē-ŏt′ĭks, sĕm′ē-, sē′mī-)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The theory and study of signs and symbols, especially as elements of language or other systems of communication, and comprising semantics, syntactics, and pragmatics.

se′mi·o·ti′cian (-ə-tĭsh′ən) n.

semiotics

(ˌsɛmɪˈɒtɪks; ˌsiːmɪ-) or

semeiotics

n (functioning as singular)
1. (Linguistics) the study of signs and symbols, esp the relations between written or spoken signs and their referents in the physical world or the world of ideas. See also semantics, syntactics, pragmatics
2. (Medicine) the scientific study of the symptoms of disease; symptomatology
Also: semiology or semeiology

se•mi•ot•ics

(ˌsi miˈɒt ɪks, ˌsɛm i-, ˌsi maɪ-)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
1. the study of signs and symbols as elements of communicative behavior; the analysis of systems of communication, as language, gestures, or clothing.
2. a general theory of signs and symbolism, usu. divided into the branches of pragmatics, semantics, and syntactics.
[1875–80]
se`mi•o•ti′cian (-əˈtɪʃ ən) n.

semiotics

- The study of signs and symbols and their use or interpretation.
See also related terms for interpretation.

semiotics

a theory of symbology that embraces pragmatics and linguistics. — semiotic, adj.
See also: Knowledge
the study of the relationship between symbology and language. — semiotician, semioticist, n.
See also: Linguistics

semiotics

The study of signs and/or symbols; sometimes known as semiology.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.semiotics - (philosophy) a philosophical theory of the functions of signs and symbols
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Translations
sémiotika
semiotika
semiotik

semiotics

[ˌsemɪˈɒtɪks] NSINGsemiótica f

semiotics

[ˌsɛmiˈɒtɪks] nsémiotique fsemi-precious semiprecious [ˌsɛmiˈprɛʃəs] adj [stone] → semi-précieux/euse

semiotics

n singSemiotik f

semiotics

semeiotics [ˌsɛmɪˈɒtɪks] nsg (Ling) → semiotica (Med) → semeiotica

se·mi·ot·ics

, semeiotics
n. semiótica, rama de la medicina que trata de las señales y síntomas de una enfermedad.
References in periodicals archive ?
Objective: Semiotics aims to develop a pattern-driven framework, Built upon existing iot platforms, To enable and guarantee secure and dependable actuation and semi-autonomic behaviour in iot/iiot applications.
Scholars of philosophy, language, and literature who specialize in semiotics explore American philosopher Charles Sanders Peirce's (1839-1914) theory of signs.
Semiotics is a contemporary philosophy that analyses the significance of various forms of communication, either spoken, written, scientific or artistic.
Often called the study of signs, semiotics is a contemporary philosophy which analyzes the significance of communication, either spoken, written, scientific or artistic.
Semiotics investigates signs and symbols and how they are used in a specific context to convey meanings to the listeners and viewers.
GREIMAS, 1963), the author distances himself from the historicism that marked his earlier works and moves towards the immanentism and to the development of his greater project: the semiotics.
As just maintained by Scollon and Scollon (2003:1), 'geosemiotics' considers the role played by the interaction order, visual semiotics, and place semiotics in discourses which exist in the material world.
Third, Ehrat attempts to develop a theoretical model of scandal based on semiotics, building from the reality of public opinion and scandal.
95--To understand the major significance of this very important translation of a central text in medieval Latin semiotics, one must recall that it is the first English translation of a missing chapter from Roger Bacon's Opus maius, part three, on the utility of languages, that is, the utility of languages for theological studies taken in the broadest sense of the term.
Without specifying any proximity to semiotics, Sidney Levy, in a paper published in 1959, is the first researcher who speaks about symbols in marketing in the wake of the changes intervened in the American society, where more people wanted "more leisure, more money, more possessions, more pleasures".
Drawing on her work as an anthropologist, Portis-Winner proposes cultural semiotics as a new paradigm or world view unified by broad themes and yet divided by wide differences and interpretations, and possibly encompassing several closely related, contiguous but differing sub-paradigms.
The immediate implications of semiotics for linguistics are evident to the extent that all language is composed technically of signs, in form of words.