semiotics


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se·mi·ot·ics

also se·mei·ot·ics  (sē′mē-ŏt′ĭks, sĕm′ē-, sē′mī-)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The theory and study of signs and symbols, especially as elements of language or other systems of communication, and comprising semantics, syntactics, and pragmatics.

se′mi·o·ti′cian (-ə-tĭsh′ən) n.

semiotics

(ˌsɛmɪˈɒtɪks; ˌsiːmɪ-) or

semeiotics

n (functioning as singular)
1. (Linguistics) the study of signs and symbols, esp the relations between written or spoken signs and their referents in the physical world or the world of ideas. See also semantics, syntactics, pragmatics
2. (Medicine) the scientific study of the symptoms of disease; symptomatology
Also: semiology or semeiology

se•mi•ot•ics

(ˌsi miˈɒt ɪks, ˌsɛm i-, ˌsi maɪ-)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
1. the study of signs and symbols as elements of communicative behavior; the analysis of systems of communication, as language, gestures, or clothing.
2. a general theory of signs and symbolism, usu. divided into the branches of pragmatics, semantics, and syntactics.
[1875–80]
se`mi•o•ti′cian (-əˈtɪʃ ən) n.

semiotics

- The study of signs and symbols and their use or interpretation.
See also related terms for interpretation.

semiotics

a theory of symbology that embraces pragmatics and linguistics. — semiotic, adj.
See also: Knowledge
the study of the relationship between symbology and language. — semiotician, semioticist, n.
See also: Linguistics

semiotics

The study of signs and/or symbols; sometimes known as semiology.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.semiotics - (philosophy) a philosophical theory of the functions of signs and symbols
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Translations
sémiotika
semiotika
semiotik

semiotics

[ˌsemɪˈɒtɪks] NSINGsemiótica f

semiotics

[ˌsɛmiˈɒtɪks] nsémiotique fsemi-precious semiprecious [ˌsɛmiˈprɛʃəs] adj [stone] → semi-précieux/euse

semiotics

n singSemiotik f

semiotics

semeiotics [ˌsɛmɪˈɒtɪks] nsg (Ling) → semiotica (Med) → semeiotica

se·mi·ot·ics

, semeiotics
n. semiótica, rama de la medicina que trata de las señales y síntomas de una enfermedad.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Intersection of Semiotics and Phenomenology: Peirce and Heidegger in Dialogue
A Salesman, 1979/2017, the central work that took up the entire back wall of the gallery in Hal Fischer's exhibition "Gay Semiotics," was originally installed as a billboard at the gateway to San Francisco's Castro district, famously the center of gay pride activism in the 1960s and 1970s.
Semiotics is a contemporary philosophy that analyses the significance of various forms of communication, either spoken, written, scientific or artistic.
Often called the study of signs, semiotics is a contemporary philosophy which analyzes the significance of communication, either spoken, written, scientific or artistic.
Semiotics is another major disciplines to study the critical effect of the different discourses present in the society through signs.
Apart from Aremu (2008) which studied the pragmatic presuppositions in DKH and Dasylva not much work that are specific has been done on the analysis of cultural semiotics in proverbs employed by Wole Soyinka in DKH.
These include 'geosemiotics', 'indexicality', 'visual semiotics', 'Interlude on geosemiotics', 'Code preference', 'Inscription', 'Emplacement', 'Discourses in space and time', and 'Indexicality, dialogicality, and selection in action'.
Third, Ehrat attempts to develop a theoretical model of scandal based on semiotics, building from the reality of public opinion and scandal.
Paper: $19.95--To understand the major significance of this very important translation of a central text in medieval Latin semiotics, one must recall that it is the first English translation of a missing chapter from Roger Bacon's Opus maius, part three, on the utility of languages, that is, the utility of languages for theological studies taken in the broadest sense of the term.