semireligious

semireligious

(ˌsɛmɪrɪˈlɪdʒəs)
adj
partly religious; religious to a limited degree; having some religious or quasi-religious content

sem•i•re•li•gious

(ˌsɛm i rɪˈlɪdʒ əs, ˌsɛm aɪ-)

adj.
having a somewhat religious character.
[1860–65]
References in periodicals archive ?
It is also not a religious or a semireligious movement.
Man does indeed stand in great "need" of religion: wherefore, whenever the traditional religion of a civilization is weakening, and irreligious patterns of thought acquire ascendency in men's minds, a secondary appearance of semireligious or para-religious attitudes can be observed.
The pair soon work out that the murder is linked to a semireligious cult with its root in alchemy thanks to the image from a book deliberately left at the crime scene and a distinctive tattoo adorning the victim's chest.
The semireligious terminology is deliberate; the path from poem to prayer is a short one.
I saw men in goat hair, bones, and seashell costumes, and cross-dressed as black widows: altogether semireligious and semi-devilish and truly disturbing.
The Courtly Lover thought of himself as acting in a semireligious context, serving the all powerful god of love and worshipping his 'lady saint.
Despite these minor shortcomings, Eckley's epic biography of a semireligious Victorian reformer reveals much about Britain and the world in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, including the dark side of life in London, the struggle for women's rights, the influence of the press, the intricacy of international politics, and even spiritualism.
3) The Governor goes on to state that, 'While the movement promoted by the Kikuyu Central Association is at present confined to Kikuyu within reach of Indian influence in Nairobi, there is danger that this emotional and semireligious propaganda may spread very rapidly among excitable and ignorant natives.
These rituals have semireligious undertones and come to represent "humanity's dark liturgy.
I remember studying a primitive group of Siberian Inuit, who - as part of their culture - used hallucinogenic mushrooms to achieve a semireligious experience.
However, they were often accompanied by a wish for the success of the operation in the form of religious or semireligious phrases.
In an interview by Anna Katsavos in 1988, Carter explained that the "demythologising business" (Carter, "Notes" 71) to which she subscribes ideologically consists in finding out "what certain configurations of imagery in our society, in our culture, really stand for, what they mean, underneath the kind of semireligious coating that makes people not particularly want to interfere with them" (Katsavos 12).