semisedentary

semisedentary

(ˌsɛmɪˈsɛdəntərɪ)
adj
partially or somewhat sedentary
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References in periodicals archive ?
There are 19 chapters divided into four parts: a neglected anthropology: hunter-gatherer violence and warfare; violence and warfare among mobile foragers; violence and warfare among semisedentary hunter-gatherer; synthesis and conclusion.
The full scale includes the following physical states (in ascending order of increasing ambulation): "bedridden," "sedentary," "semisedentary," "light labor," "moderate labor," and "heavy labor" Patients were provided with several examples of the kind of activities that one might expect tobe able to perform in each category without pain or inhibition and were asked to select which category is most representative of their joint performance.
The author [page 346] "found no evidence that Neanderthals experienced trauma more frequently or with a different distribution throughout the body beyond what is commonly experienced by modern humans in the context of hunter-gatherers, nomads, semisedentary foragers, and medieval small landowners" Furthermore, Estabrook' data did not support the assertion that trauma played a more influential role in the lives of Neanderthals than any of the groups mentioned above.
granosa by semisedentary populations who targeted the species at times when other, more preferred resources were not available.
In particular, the smallpox epidemic of 1780-82 marked a turning point in the struggles between westward-expanding Sioux groups and the semisedentary tribes that lived along the upper Missouri in present-day North and South Dakota, the Mandans, Hidatsas, and Arikaras.
65) in lithic and ceramic production, more complex social structures, and a shift in the mountain regions from semisedentary to mobile groups, with a concurrent shift in the lowlands to completely sedentary villages.
The economic attraction of Fort Lemhi led to the formation of a seasonal, semisedentary indigenous community.
The Byzantine rulers' employment of the Ghassanids holds interest for our study in that this people, who converted to Christianity (Monophysite, not Chalcedonian) sometime in the sixth century, lived, now semisedentary, just to the east of the Golan, beyond the Wadi Er-Ruqqad, and perhaps in some villages within the area from which our inscriptions come.
A similar economic cycle was followed by the sedentary and semisedentary stockraisers living on the northern foothills of the KOpet-Dag Range.
The Prairie subregion was the home of several semisedentary horticultural tribes, including the Arikara, Hidatsa, Iowa, Kansa, Kitsai, Mandan, Missouri, Omaha, Osage, Otoe, Ponca, Quapaw, and Wichita.
Captives seem to have fared less well among the Jicarilla Apaches, a semisedentary people who practiced a seasonal economy that balanced hunting and collecting with extensive horticulture.