semiwild

semiwild

(ˌsɛmɪˈwaɪld)
adj
(Environmental Science) not fully domesticated; partially tamed or cultivated; having some characteristics of the wild
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
She had been semiwild and had found a home where she was loved.
For the semiwild ponies and cattle that roam this land, giving birth to foals and calves during this fickle and changeable season isn't easy.
stigerum DC is in the semiwild state in southern Europe and grows throughout Morocco with the exception of desert regions;
It would introduce an inappropriate suburban ambience to the entrance to a park which is valued and visited by many for its superb variety of plant life in a semiwild setting".
Kim, "Genetic diversity and structure in semiwild and domesticated chiles (Capsicum annuum; Solanaceae) from Mexico," American Journal of Botany, vol.
A great variety of local and introduced vegetable crops are grown in Cameroon and these crops together with a significant number of wild and semiwild plants like Amaranthus hybridus and Amaranthus cruentus form a valuable complementary food in the daily diet [4].
schlegelii from wild population in this study, namely, SAM01 and SAM02, in the same subclade with all 5 semiwild T.
macroptera is a semiwild species of Citrus native in Malesia and Melanesia [16].
Tibetan sheep (Ovis aries) and black and white yaks(Bos grunniens) are important semiwild animals in China, and they mainly live in Tibetan Plateau which has low air pressure, lower temperature, and oxygen content.
[paragraph] Meanwhile, below Fort Randall Dam at Pickstown, South Dakota, a 45-mile section of semiwild river flows into Lewis and Clark Lake, created by Gavins Point Dam, near Yankton.
As we were about to be served, a semiwild orangutan called Percy tried to swing on board to join us.
Kim, "Genetic diversity and structure in semiwild and domesticated chiles (Capsicum annuum ; Solanaceae) from Mexico," American Journal of Botany, vol.