sending

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scend

also send  (sĕnd)Nautical
intr.v. scend·ed, scend·ing, scends also send·ed or send·ing or sends
To heave upward on a wave or swell.
n.
The rising movement of a ship on a wave or swell.

[Probably alteration (influenced by descend or ascend) of send.]

send 1

 (sĕnd)
v. sent (sĕnt), send·ing, sends
v.tr.
1. To cause to be conveyed by an intermediary to a destination: send goods by plane.
2. To dispatch, as by a communications medium: send a message by radio.
3.
a. To direct to go on a mission: sent troops into the Middle East.
b. To require or enable to go: sent her children to college.
c. To direct (a person) to a source of information; refer: sent the student to the reference section of the library.
4.
a. To give off (heat, for example); emit or issue: a stove that sends forth great warmth.
b. To utter or otherwise emit (sound): sent forth a cry of pain.
5. To hit so as to direct or propel with force; drive: The batter sent the ball to left field. The slap on my back sent me staggering.
6. To cause to take place or occur: We will meet whatever vicissitudes fate may send.
7.
a. To put or drive into a given state or condition: horrifying news that sent them into a panic.
b. Slang To transport with delight; carry away: That music really sends me.
v.intr.
1. To dispatch someone to do an errand or convey a message: Let's send out for hamburgers.
2. To dispatch a request or order, especially by mail: send away for a new catalogue.
3. To transmit a message or messages: The radio operator was still sending when the ship went down.
Phrasal Verbs:
send down Chiefly British
To suspend or dismiss from a university.
send for
To request to come by means of a message or messenger; summon.
send in
1. To cause to arrive or to be delivered to the recipient: Let's send in a letter of protest.
2. Sports To put (a player) into or back into a game or contest: The coach is sending in the kicker.
3. To cause (someone) to arrive in or become involved in a particular place or situation: The commander sent in the sappers. It's time to send in the lawyers.
send off
Sports To eject (a player), as from a soccer game, especially for a flagrant violation of the rules.
send up Informal
1. To send to jail: was sent up for 20 years.
2. To make a parody of: "grandiloquently eccentric but witty verbiage ... that would send up the nastiness of suburban London" (New York).
Idioms:
send flying Informal
To cause to be knocked or scattered about with force: a blow to the table that sent the dishes flying.
send packing
To dismiss (someone) abruptly.

[Middle English senden, from Old English sendan; see sent- in Indo-European roots.]

send′er n.
Synonyms: send1, dispatch, forward, route, ship, transmit
These verbs mean to cause to go or be taken to a destination: sent the package by parcel post; dispatched a union representative to the factory; forwards the mail to their new address; routed the soldiers through New York; shipped his books to his dormitory; transmits money by cable.

send 2

 (sĕnd)
v. & n. Nautical
Variant of scend.

sending

  • granulated sugar - So called because the last step in processing white table sugar is sending it through a granulator, where it is dried and formed into tiny grains.
  • mission - First denoted sending the Holy Spirit into the world, from Latin mittere, "send."
  • perennial - First meant "remaining leafy throughout the year"; plants living three or more years—dying aboveground and sending up fresh growth every year—are perennials.
  • radio - An abbreviation of radiotelegraphy, the sending of messages by electromagnetic rays.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sending - the act of causing something to go (especially messages)sending - the act of causing something to go (especially messages)
causation, causing - the act of causing something to happen
transmission, transmittal, transmitting - the act of sending a message; causing a message to be transmitted
References in classic literature ?
Having dismounted he went up to the Emperor with rapid strides and in a loud voice began boldly demonstrating the necessity of sending reinforcements.
Jennings's advice, of sending for the Palmers' apothecary.
Thus Iphigenia is revealed to Orestes by the sending of the letter; but another act of recognition is required to make Orestes known to Iphigenia.
These days past, when sending Your Excellency my plays, that had appeared in print before being shown on the stage, I said, if I remember well, that Don Quixote was putting on his spurs to go and render homage to Your Excellency.
we arrived in a few hours; and on sending in our names were immediately admitted to Sophia, the Wife of Edward's freind.
That seemed a good idea; so the Historian rigged up a high tower in his back yard, and took lessons in wireless telegraphy until he understood it, and then began to call "Princess Dorothy of Oz" by sending messages into the air.
We will first go and see our own dear grandmother, and tell her where our step-mother is sending us.