sensationist

sensationist

(sɛnˈseɪʃənɪst)
n
someone who makes use of or creates sensation, esp a writer or actor
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
300) Sensationism emerges as the agglutinating concept of the Portuguese modernist movement, which must be based on three principles: "(1) Every object is a personal sensation; (2) All art is the conversion of a sensation into an object; (3) Therefore, all art is the conversion of a sensation into another sensation." In other words, "to the sensationist, every idea, every feeling expressed, has to be expressed in a different way from that which expresses another" (Pessoa, 1966, pp.
Blue Dot--the sensationist (need the WHY, driven by their emotions, easily hurt, need time to develop a "feeling" for what you want them to do, you'll hear them say "I FEEL").
(49) The sensationist philosophy of the period--including Diderot and Rousseau's vision of the ideal space of representation not as the theater but rather as the salon or the open-air festival--informed subsequent modifications in theater architecture that radically reconceived "the spectator's sensory encounter with the stage." (50)
The first section focuses on Rousseau's conception of the first stage of development, and especially his sensationist claim that all knowledge originates in sensory impressions.
To the extent to which Conrad is a sensationist, his Modernism reaches back to a modernity inaugurated by Muller's and Helmholtz's discoveries in the physiology of the senses, as opposed to the more completely psychological apprehension of a mental interior associated with the novels of James Joyce and Woolf.
"Revisiting Modernism and the Myth of the Descent to the Underworld: The Fin-de-siecle Hell of Indifference and Fragmentation in Charles Palliser's The Sensationist." The AnaChronisT 13 (2007/2008): 181-201.
Leung studies how Liu fashions in the two pieces the historical figures, Emperor Yang of Tsui [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and Yuan Shikai [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], from a psychological perspective, and how he continues the Shanghai New Sensationist School's experiments and develops his modernist style.
Essays and excerpts of longer texts from the 19th and 20th centuries examine such topics as the sense of direction, the anatomy of mysticism, the Mesmerism investigation and the crisis of sensationist science, the erotics of telepathy in the British Society for Psychical Research's experiments in intimacy, some thoughts on the afterlife from spirit photography to phantom films, the sense of being stared at, tactility and distraction, peyote and the mystic vision, and the embodiment of symbols and the acculturation of the anthropologist.
O'Neal, The Authority of Experience: Sensationist Theory in the French Enlightenment (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1996), 22, 246; also John C.
The device is employed extensively by the equally sensationist Sa-Carneiro.
Rooted in post-Lockian sensationist perception, it explores the strengths and weaknesses of language as a means of conferring objectivity on subjective experience.