sensibly


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sen·si·ble

 (sĕn′sə-bəl)
adj.
1.
a. Acting with or exhibiting good judgment; reasonable: a sensible person; a sensible choice.
b. Not ornate or impractical: a sensible hairdo; sensible shoes.
2. Having a perception of something; cognizant: "I am sensible that a good deal more is still to be done" (Edmund Burke). See Synonyms at aware.
3. Perceptible or appreciable by the senses or by the mind: a sensible difference in temperature.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin sēnsibilis, from sēnsus, sense; see sense.]

sen′si·ble·ness n.
sen′si·bly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.sensibly - with good sense or in a reasonable or intelligent manner; "he acted sensibly in the crisis"; "speak more sanely about these affairs"; "acted quite reasonably"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
بصورَةٍ مَعْقولَه، بِعَقْل
rozumně
fornuftigt
skynsamlega

sensibly

[ˈsensəblɪ] ADV (= carefully) → con sensatez; (= wisely) → prudentemente
she acted very sensiblyobró muy prudentemente
he sensibly answered thatcontestó con tino que ...
try to behave sensiblyintenta comportarte como es debido
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

sensibly

[ˈsɛnsɪbli] adv
[act, eat] → raisonnablement
(= appropriately) [dressed] → de manière adaptée
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

sensibly

adv (= reasonably)vernünftig; he very sensibly ignored the questioner hat die Frage vernünftigerweise ignoriert; sensibly pricedpreisgünstig
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

sensibly

[ˈsɛnsəblɪ] adv (reasonably, behave, talk) → assennatamente, con molto buon senso
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

sensible

(ˈsensəbl) adjective
1. wise; having or showing good judgement. She's a sensible, reliable person; a sensible suggestion.
2. (of clothes etc) practical rather than attractive or fashionable. She wears flat, sensible shoes.
ˈsensibly adverb
in a sensible way. He sensibly brought a spare pair of shoes.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
To speak sensibly, I think assassins have been invented by fathers and mothers to frighten children who want to run away at night.
As the people grew more numerous, and their trade one with another increased, the want of current money was still more sensibly felt.
"Thou art a great philosopher, Sancho," said Don Quixote; "thou speakest very sensibly; I know not who taught thee.
The projectile sustained a certain shock, which was sensibly felt in the interior.
But the incidents of his adventure grew sensibly sharper and clearer under the attrition of thinking them over, and so he presently found himself leaning to the impression that the thing might not have been a dream, after all.
You yourself, sir, I am convinced, in my case, would have done the same: for none ever so sensibly felt the misfortunes of others.
As soon as he had left the room the general merriment stopped and the guests began to converse sensibly and quietly with one another.
She had been repeatedly very earnest in trying to get Anne included in the visit to London, sensibly open to all the injustice and all the discredit of the selfish arrangements which shut her out, and on many lesser occasions had endeavoured to give Elizabeth the advantage of her own better judgement and experience; but always in vain: Elizabeth would go her own way; and never had she pursued it in more decided opposition to Lady Russell than in this selection of Mrs Clay; turning from the society of so deserving a sister, to bestow her affection and confidence on one who ought to have been nothing to her but the object of distant civility.
But the second son, too, said sensibly enough: 'What I give you will be taken away from myself; be off!' and he left the little man standing and went on.
His absence is a void which is but too sensibly felt to-day.
Who is likely to make suitable provisions for the public defense, as that body to which the guardianship of the public safety is confided; which, as the centre of information, will best understand the extent and urgency of the dangers that threaten; as the representative of the WHOLE, will feel itself most deeply interested in the preservation of every part; which, from the responsibility implied in the duty assigned to it, will be most sensibly impressed with the necessity of proper exertions; and which, by the extension of its authority throughout the States, can alone establish uniformity and concert in the plans and measures by which the common safety is to be secured?
The consequence was that they were no longer taught to read, nor even to master Arithmetic enough to enable them to count the angles of their husband or children; and hence they sensibly declined during each generation in intellectual power.