deafness

(redirected from sensorineural deafness)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

deaf

 (dĕf)
adj. deaf·er, deaf·est
1. Partially or completely lacking in the sense of hearing.
2. often Deaf Of or relating to the Deaf or their culture.
3. Unwilling or refusing to listen; heedless: was deaf to our objections.
n. (used with a pl. verb)
1. Deaf people considered as a group. Used with the.
2. often Deaf The community of deaf people who use American Sign Language as a primary means of communication. Used with the.

[Middle English def, deef, from Old English dēaf.]

deaf′ly adv.
deaf′ness n.
Usage Note: The rise of the Deaf Pride movement in the 1980s introduced a distinction between deaf and Deaf, with the capitalized form used specifically in referring to deaf persons belonging to the community—also known as Deaf culture—that has formed around the use of American Sign Language as the preferred means of communication.

Deafness

See also ear; hearing

a type of ear trumpet used by the deaf.
an acronym for the American Sign Language for the Deaf, a system of communication through gestures and hand signals.
loss or absence of the power of hearing.
a form of deafness in which the sufferer hears only his own voice, and that very loudly. See also medical specialties.
the technique of communicating through signs made with the fingers, as in the manual alphabet for the deaf.
the condition of lacking both hearing and speech. Also called surdomutism. — deafmute, n.
the teaching of communication through the use of hand signals to the deaf. — manualist, n.
1. the principles of the oral method of training the deaf, as lip reading.
2. the support or practice of these principles. Cf. manualism. — oralist, n.
a hearing device for the deaf that is placed against the upper teeth so it can transmit vibrations to the auditory nerve through the bones of the skull.
defective sense of hearing. Also paracousia.
a procedure for producing visible records of sound waves or speech sounds, especially to assist the deaf in using the telephone. Also called visible speech. — phonautographic, adj.
Pathology. the degree of deafness that is sufficient to block the acquisition of speech by normal means.
deafmutism. — surdomute, n.

deafness

The total or partial inability to hear. It can be caused by a variety of factors including diseases such as otosclerosis, blockage of the ear canal by wax, damage to the eardrum, damage to the bones of the middle ear, and damage to nerves that take messages from the ear to the brain.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deafness - partial or complete loss of hearingdeafness - partial or complete loss of hearing
hearing disorder, hearing impairment - impairment of the sense of hearing
tin ear, tone deafness - an inability to distinguish differences in pitch
deaf-muteness, deaf-mutism - congenital deafness that results in inability to speak
Translations
صَمَم، طَرَش
hluchota
døvhed
kuurous
süketség
heyrnarleysi
hluchota
gluhota

deafness

[ˈdefnɪs] Nsordera f

deafness

[ˈdɛfnɪs] n (= inability to hear) → surdité f

deafness

n (lit, fig)Taubheit f(to gegenüber)

deafness

[ˈdɛfnɪs] nsordità

deaf

(def) adjective
1. unable to hear. She has been deaf since birth.
2. (with to) refusing to understand or to listen. He was deaf to all arguments.
ˈdeafness noun
ˈdeafen verb
to make hearing difficult; to have an unpleasant effect on the hearing. I was deafened by the noise in there!
ˈdeafening adjective
very loud. the deafening roar of the engine.
ˌdeaf-ˈmute noun
a person who is deaf and dumb.
fall on deaf ears
(of a warning etc) to be ignored.
turn a deaf ear to
deliberately to ignore. They turned a deaf ear to my advice.

deaf·ness

n. sordera.

deafness

n sordera
References in periodicals archive ?
The tympanogram of sensorineural deafness also showed "A" type curve, the stapedius muscle acoustic reflex threshold could also be increased or not induced, but some patients with SHL might have loudness recruitment.
Hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness, and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome, also called Barakat syndrome, is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by haploinsufficiency of the GATA-binding protein 3 ( GATA3 ) gene located on the 10p15 chromosome.
Examples of severe systemic manifestations included scleritis, sensorineural deafness, spinal cord lesions, stroke, mesenteric ischemia, alveolar hemorrhage, cranial nerve palsy, respiratory failure, red blood cell casts in the urine, or a greater than 25% drop in creatinine clearance, among others.
Infants or fetuses with birth defects were aggregated into four mutually exclusive categories of defects characterized by CDC subject matter experts as being consistent with those observed with congenital Zika virus infection: 1) brain abnormalities or microcephaly (head circumference at delivery <3rd percentile for sex and gestational age) (5); 2) neural tube defects and other early brain malformations; 3) eye abnormalities without mention of a brain abnormality included in the first two categories; and 4) other consequences of CNS dysfunction, specifically joint contractures and congenital sensorineural deafness, without mention of brain or eye abnormalities included in another category.
Unknown aetiology prevailed as main cause and this indicates the need to carrying out genetic studies in congenital sensorineural deafness with unknown cause to find out aetiological factor.
He was screened for hearing loss ( due to aminoglycosides toxicity and NBS association but no evidence of sensorineural deafness found) and visual impairment.
6, 7] Distinct from these compressive phenomena, some patients with autosomal recessive osteopetrosis variants (neuropathic ARO) display signs of primary neurodegeneration including primary seizures in the setting of normal calcium levels, developmental delay, hypotonia, retinal atrophy, and sensorineural deafness.
Binaural hearing after cochlear implantation in subjects with unilateral sensorineural deafness and tinnitus.
A 50-year-old woman was being treated for sudden-onset sensorineural deafness.
As part of this validation, we recruited a total of 205 patients affected with non-syndromic hearing loss from a well-described Cameroonian cohort [3] and newly recruited black South Africans of Xhosa ancestry, the majority (85%) of whom had sensorineural deafness.
1,2) Among these associations, patients usually present with early-onset DM (insulin-dependent type) followed by OA in the first decade, while DI and sensorineural deafness are usually presented in the second decade.
5 The problems include loss of fine motor control, rigidity, ataxia, spasticity, hyporeflexia or areflexia, chorea, motor neuron signs or segmental demyelination, sensorineural deafness and progressive mental retardation.