sentence stress


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

sentence stress

Sentence stress (also called prosodic stress) refers to the emphasis placed on certain words within a sentence. This varying emphasis gives English a cadence, resulting in a natural songlike quality when spoken fluently.
Sentence stress is generally determined by whether a word is considered a “content word” or a “function word,” and the vocal space between stressed words creates the rhythm of a sentence.
Continue reading...

sentence stress

n.
The variation in emphasis or vocal stress on the syllables of words within a sentence.

sentence stress

n
(Linguistics) the stress given to a word or words in a sentence, often conveying nuances of meaning or emphasis

sen′tence stress`


n.
the pattern of stress given to words arranged in a sentence, often serving to express emphasis, attitude, etc.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sentence stress - the distribution of stresses within a sentence
stress, accent, emphasis - the relative prominence of a syllable or musical note (especially with regard to stress or pitch); "he put the stress on the wrong syllable"
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Even though this study was mostly based on the misdecoding of segments, word stress and sentence stress played an important role in mishearing, not only the distribution of stress patterns, but the effect of these on the segments in question.
More specifically, primary sentence stress (Hahn, 2004), word stress (Field, 2005; Zielinski, 2008) and speaking rate (Munro & Derwing, 2001) affect intelligibility.
The sentence stress may appear in two forms: the normal/neutral/nonemphatic and the emphatic.
Then, I will review articles from different sources on what contents should be included in a pronunciation instruction class and specific strategies or techniques on how to teach these components including intonation, stress (word stress and sentence stress) and rhythm, consonants (phonemes) and vowels (phonemes).
Since new information tends to occur in sentence final position (end-focus) and coincide with greatest sentence stress, a lengthened line provides an emphatic closure.
What Szwedek's rule really tells us is that since a speaker does not intend to use any "new" noun in sentence (1), but rather wants to make the verb "new", which is a special situation, he places a sentence stress on the verb.
Some examples of macro-skills include notetaking, lecture organization, and key ideas; some micro-skills included in the textbook are sentence stress and word families.
If it were only a formal decision, having nothing to do with semantics or pragmatics, then the choice of position of the sentence stress would be totally arbitrary.
All attested tokens ending in -lich(e) are placed in a sentence stressed position (10a), whereas, with the exception of but a few examples, the attested -ly forms do not assume a sentence stress (10b).
Compare the following examples (capital letters indicate the place of the sentence stress):
Sentence stressed the importance of tourism in a new growth pattern that the economy would have to adapt to.
In the draft text set to be adopted by the Council, behind closed doors on 21 November, a sentence stresses that the Council considers it very important to inform the EU's citizens in their own language and asks the Commission to promote all the Union's languages on its website.