sentient

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sen·tient

 (sĕn′shənt, -shē-ənt, -tē-ənt)
adj.
1. Having sense perception; conscious: "The living knew themselves just sentient puppets on God's stage" (T.E. Lawrence).
2. Experiencing sensation or feeling.

[Latin sentiēns, sentient-, present participle of sentīre, to feel; see sent- in Indo-European roots.]

sen′tient·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sentient

(ˈsɛntɪənt)
adj
having the power of sense perception or sensation; conscious
n
rare a sentient person or thing
[C17: from Latin sentiēns feeling, from sentīre to perceive]
ˈsentiently adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sen•tient

(ˈsɛn ʃənt)

adj.
1. having the power of perception by the senses; conscious.
2. characterized by sensation and consciousness.
[1595–1605; < Latin sentient-, s. of sentiēns, present participle of sentīre to feel; see -ent]
sen′tient•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sentient - endowed with feeling and unstructured consciousnesssentient - endowed with feeling and unstructured consciousness; "the living knew themselves just sentient puppets on God's stage"- T.E.Lawrence
insensate, insentient - devoid of feeling and consciousness and animation; "insentient (or insensate) stone"
2.sentient - consciously perceiving; "sentient of the intolerable load"; "a boy so sentient of his surroundings"- W.A.White
conscious - knowing and perceiving; having awareness of surroundings and sensations and thoughts; "remained conscious during the operation"; "conscious of his faults"; "became conscious that he was being followed"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

sentient

adjective feeling, living, conscious, live, sensitive, reactive sentient creatures, human and nonhuman alike
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

sentient

adjective
1. Marked by comprehension, cognizance, and perception:
Slang: hip.
Idiom: on to.
2. Able to receive and respond to external stimuli:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

sentient

[ˈsenʃənt] ADJsensitivo, sensible
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

sentient

[ˈsɛntiənt] adj [being, creature] → doué(e) de sens
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

sentient

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

sentient

[ˈsɛntɪənt] adj (frm) (creature, being) → sensibile, senziente
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
This opinion, in its general form, was that of the sentience of all vegetable things.
Each day he tried the lifting of greater weight, and it seemed almost as if the machine had a sentience of its own, which was increasing with the obstacles placed before it.
Not a thing seemed to be stirring, but all to be grim and fixed as death or fate, so that a thin streak of white mist, that crept with almost imperceptible slowness across the grass towards the house, seemed to have a sentience and a vitality of its own.