sentimentalism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sen·ti·men·tal·ism

 (sĕn′tə-mĕn′tl-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. A predilection for the sentimental.
2. An idea or expression marked by excessive sentiment.

sen′ti·men′tal·ist n.

sentimentalism

(ˌsɛntɪˈmɛntəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. the state or quality of being sentimental
2. an act, statement, etc, that is sentimental
ˌsentiˈmentalist n

sen•ti•men•tal•ism

(ˌsɛn təˈmɛn tlˌɪz əm)

n.
sentimental character or display.
[1810–20]
sen`ti•men′tal•ist, n.

sentimentalism

an excessive indulgence in sentiment or emotionalism, predominance of feeling over reason and intellect, as the death scene of Little Nell in Dickens’s Old Curiosity Shop. — sentimentalist, n.
See also: Literary Style
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sentimentalism - the excessive expression of tender feelings, nostalgia, or sadness in any form
glop, treacle, mush, slop - writing or music that is excessively sweet and sentimental
formulation, expression - the style of expressing yourself; "he suggested a better formulation"; "his manner of expression showed how much he cared"
2.sentimentalism - a predilection for sentimentality
sentimentality, drippiness, mawkishness, mushiness, soupiness, sloppiness - falsely emotional in a maudlin way

sentimentalism

noun
The quality or condition of being affectedly or overly emotional:
Slang: sappiness.
Translations

sentimentalism

[ˌsentɪˈmentəlɪzəm] Nsentimentalismo m

sentimentalism

References in classic literature ?
Largely made up of Emotion are: (1) true Sentiment, which is fine feeling of any sort, and which should not degenerate into Sentimentalism
It has pitilessly torn asunder the motley feudal ties that bound man to his "natural superiors," and has left remaining no other nexus between man and man than naked self-interest, than callous "cash payment." It has drowned the most heavenly ecstasies of religious fervour, of chivalrous enthusiasm, of philistine sentimentalism, in the icy water of egotistical calculation.
I thought you were free from all vulgar sentimentalism and that you had a more independent mind.
I suppose they were exercis ing and developing their racial sentimentalism by the means of that dummy.
As a pattern in the crises I have dealt with, I have found three things: information is incomplete and you have to act on sudden and dramatic developments; what is sudden and dramatic also lends itself to exaggeration, sentimentalism and emotionalism; and thirdly, much of the developments thereafter are influenced by the kind of interpretation and extrapolation of the crisis."
One review, for instance, quotes Whitman's denial of sentimentalism and exclaims "Yet, he is a sentimentalist!" ("Our Book" 1856), while another writes that the author of Leaves must have been "possessed of the soul of a sentimental donkey that had died of disappointed love" (Griswold 1855) in order to produce such peculiar poetics.
However, religious sentimentalism is not merely political rhetoric; it has become a life-threatening reality to the extent that mere dissent can bring harm.
Sanger, whose organization is now the leading abortion establishment, wrote in the same article, "Birth control propaganda is thus the entering wedge for the Eugenic educator," and, "Possibly drastic and Spartan methods may be forced upon society if it continues complacently to encourage the chance and chaotic breeding that has resulted from our stupidly cruel sentimentalism."
Their approval of the young scholar further steeled him against sentimentalism (see, e.g., p.
could lead Puritans to literary strategies that look in many ways like precursors of sentimentalism" (143).
A tragic blend of international intrigue, inadequate regional policies and blind sentimentalism has produced what we are now witnessing in northern Iraq.
disability and age, structural unevenness or excess, sentimentalism and melodrama, social reform, and women's use of technology" (4).