septic


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Related to septic: sepsis, Septic arthritis

sep·tic

 (sĕp′tĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, having the nature of, or affected by sepsis.
2. Causing sepsis; putrefactive.

[Latin sēpticus, putrefying, from Greek sēptikos, from sēptos, rotten, from sēpein, to make rotten.]

sep·tic′i·ty (-tĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

septic

(ˈsɛptɪk)
adj
1. (Pathology) of, relating to, or caused by sepsis. Also (archaic): septical
2. (Pathology) of, relating to, or caused by putrefaction
n
informal Austral and NZ short for septic tank
[C17: from Latin sēpticus, from Greek sēptikos, from sēptos decayed, from sēpein to make rotten]
ˈseptically adv
septicity n

sep•tic

(ˈsɛp tɪk)

adj.
1. pertaining to or of the nature of sepsis; infected.
2. putrefactive.
[1595–1605; < Latin sēpticus < Greek sēptikós]
sep′ti•cal•ly, adv.
sep•tic′i•ty (-ˈtɪs ɪ ti) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.septic - containing or resulting from disease-causing organisms; "a septic sore throat"; "a septic environment"; "septic sewage"
unhealthful - detrimental to good health; "unhealthful air pollution"; "unhealthful conditions in old apartments with peeling lead-based paint"
germy - full of germs or pathological microorganisms; "the water in New York harbor is oily and dirty and germy"
antiseptic - thoroughly clean and free of or destructive to disease-causing organisms; "doctors in antiseptic green coats"; "the antiseptic effect of alcohol"; "it is said that marjoram has antiseptic qualities"
2.septic - of or relating to or caused by putrefaction; "the septic action occurs at the bottom of the septic tank"

septic

Translations
عَفِن، نَتِن
hnisající
betændt
szeptikus
eitrunar-, ígerîar-
pūliuojantisseptinis valymo rezervuarassu pūliais
pūžņojošsseptisks
hnisajúci
mikrop kapmışmikroplu

septic

[ˈseptɪk]
A. ADJséptico
to become or go or turn septicinfectarse
B. CPD septic poisoning Nsepticemia f
septic tank Nfosa f séptica, pozo m séptico

septic

[ˈsɛptɪk] adj (= infected) [wound, toe] → infecté(e)
to go septic → s'infecter

septic

adjvereitert, septisch; the wound turned septicdie Wunde eiterte

septic

[ˈsɛptɪk] adjsettico/a; (wound) → infetto/a
to go septic → infettarsi

septic

(ˈseptik) adjective
(of a wound etc) full of or caused by germs that are poisoning the blood. a septic finger; septic poisoning.
septic tank
a tank in which sewage is partially purified by the action of bacteria.

sep·tic

n. séptico-a, rel. a la sepsis;
___ shockchoque ___.

septic

adj séptico
References in periodicals archive ?
Tumor necrosis factor-dependent adhesions as a major protective mechanism early in septic peritonitis in mice.
There are many components to a septic system so as you are pumping it, especially with our licensed inspectors, they know what they are looking for.
In practice, however, people can register their septic tanks at any point before June 30, 2012.
The agency said it is sending letters and registration forms to more than 70,000 people - who are believed to have septic tanks - to make the registration process simple.
Three basic categories of septic tank additives are available: chemical, physical, and biological.
Harvard researchers utilized data from 14 patients with septic shock who participated in a placebo-controlled trial of statin drugs.
As property developers continue to build estates in suburban areas, septic tanks are becoming a more popular way of dealing with waste, when compared with plumbing vast housing complexes into the sewer and water treatment networks," he says.
declares existing septic systems "failing" in order to qualify for grants.
Most likely it's a done deal, unless the neighborhood is presently all on septic but is considering a petition to the town to switch to sewers (in which case you can usually agree to hook up or stay put).
The Flowtech septic system is designed to replace over 1,200 pounds of gravel that would otherwise be required, and prevents sand or fine soils from entering a drain field system.
Low-to-moderate-dose corticosteroid therapy has been recommended in patients with septic shock who respond poorly to stimulation with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, or cosyntropin).
Researchers at VIB and Ghent University in Flanders discovered that by inducing the release of nitric oxide (NO) gas in mice with septic shock, the animal's organs showed much less damage, while their chances of survival increased significantly.