seraglio


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to seraglio: clove pink

se·ra·glio

 (sə-răl′yō, -räl′-)
n. pl. se·ra·glios
1. A large harem.
2. A sultan's palace. Also called serai.

[Italian serraglio, enclosure, seraglio, probably partly from Vulgar Latin *serraculum, enclosure (from *serrāre, to lace up, from Latin serāre, from sera, door-bar) and partly from Turkish saray, palace (from Persian sarāy, inn; see terə- in Indo-European roots).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

seraglio

(sɛˈrɑːlɪˌəʊ) or

serail

n, pl -raglios or -rails
1. (Islam) the harem of a Muslim house or palace
2. (Islam) a sultan's palace, esp in the former Turkish empire
3. (Islam) the wives and concubines of a Muslim
[C16: from Italian serraglio animal cage, from Medieval Latin serrāculum bolt, from Latin sera a door bar; associated also with Turkish seray palace]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

har•em

(ˈhɛər əm, ˈhær-)

n.
1. the part of a Muslim palace or house reserved for the residence of women.
2. the women in a Muslim household, including the mothers, sisters, wives, concubines, daughters, entertainers, and servants.
3. a social group of female animals, as elephant seals, accompanied by a reproductive male who denies other males access to the group.
[1625–35; < Arabic ḥarīm harem, literally, forbidden]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Seraglio

 the inmates of a harem, 1634; a house of women kept for debauchery—Johnson, 1755.
Examples: seraglio of the godly (i.e., a nunnery), 1672; of flattering lusts, 1711; of maids of honour, 1860; a cock and a seraglio of seven hens, 1773.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seraglio - living quarters reserved for wives and concubines and female relatives in a Muslim householdseraglio - living quarters reserved for wives and concubines and female relatives in a Muslim household
living quarters, quarters - housing available for people to live in; "he found quarters for his family"; "I visited his bachelor quarters"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

seraglio

[seˈrɑːlɪəʊ] Nserallo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

seraglio

nSerail nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
At these words he started up, and beheld--not his Sophia--no, nor a Circassian maid richly and elegantly attired for the grand Signior's seraglio. No; without a gown, in a shift that was somewhat of the coarsest, and none of the cleanest, bedewed likewise with some odoriferous effluvia, the produce of the day's labour, with a pitchfork in her hand, Molly Seagrim approached.
We have been taught to tremble at the terrific visages of murdering janizaries, and to blush at the unveiled mysteries of a future seraglio.
So Quasimodo had fifteen bells in his seraglio; but big Marie was his favorite.
She had heard of many women, among whom were white women, who had been sold by outlaws such as Achmet Zek into the slavery of black harems, or taken farther north into the almost equally hideous existence of some Turkish seraglio.
I saw Don Gaspar, I told him the danger he was in if he let it be seen he was a man, I dressed him as a Moorish woman, and that same afternoon I brought him before the king, who was charmed when he saw him, and resolved to keep the damsel and make a present of her to the Grand Signor; and to avoid the risk she might run among the women of his seraglio, and distrustful of himself, he commanded her to be placed in the house of some Moorish ladies of rank who would protect and attend to her; and thither he was taken at once.
I would not exchange this one little English girl for the Grand Turk's whole seraglio, gazelle-eyes, houri forms, and all!"
"I'll not stand you an inch in the stead of a seraglio," I said; "so don't consider me an equivalent for one.
I, who have a seraglio at Cairo, one at Smyrna, and one at Constantinople, preside at a wedding?
Where else, indeed, could such a practice exist, even for a single day?--Imagine a revolution brought about in a Turkish seraglio, and the harem rendered the abode of bearded men; or conceive some beautiful woman in our own country running distracted at the sight of her numerous lovers murdering one another before her eyes, out of jealousy for the unequal distribution of her favours!--Heaven defend us from such a state of things!--We are scarcely amiable and forbearing enough to submit to it.
"'No sooner had we got rid of these birds, which occasioned us great annoyance, than we were terrified by the appearance of a fowl of another kind, and infinitely larger than even the rocs which I met in my former voyages; for it was bigger than the biggest of the domes on your seraglio, oh, most Munificent of Caliphs.
Accordingly, this man of no principle, who six years earlier had kept a ballet-girl, and who now, thanks to his position, made himself a seraglio with the pretty wives of the under-clerks, and lived in the world of journalists and actresses, became devotedly attentive all the evening to Celestine, and was the last to leave the house.
Germain whose houses present to the outer world a face as impassive and as suggestive of the concentration of privacy within as the blank walls of Eastern seraglios. Newman thought it a queer way for rich people to live; his ideal of grandeur was a splendid facade diffusing its brilliancy outward too, irradiating hospitality.