seraph

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Related to seraphs: seraphim, cherubim, alpinist

ser·aph

 (sĕr′əf)
n. pl. ser·a·phim (-ə-fĭm) or ser·aphs
1. Bible A celestial being having three pairs of wings.
2. seraphim Christianity The first of the nine orders of angels in medieval angelology.

[Back-formation from pl. seraphim, from Middle English seraphin, from Old English, from Late Latin seraphīn, seraphīm, from Greek serapheim, from Hebrew śərāpîm, pl. of śārāp, fiery serpent, seraph, from śārap, to burn; see śrp in Semitic roots.]

se·raph′ic (sə-răf′ĭk), se·raph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
se·raph′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

seraph

(ˈsɛrəf)
n, pl -aphs, -aphim (-əfɪm) or -aphin (-əfɪn)
1. (Theology) theol a member of the highest order of angels in the celestial hierarchies, often depicted as the winged head of a child
2. (Bible) Old Testament one of the fiery six-winged beings attendant upon Jehovah in Isaiah's vision (Isaiah 6)
[C17: back formation from plural seraphim, via Late Latin from Hebrew]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ser•aph

(ˈsɛr əf)

n., pl. -aphs, -a•phim (-ə fɪm)
1. one of the celestial beings hovering above God's throne in Isaiah's vision. Isa. 6.
2. a member of the highest order of angels. Compare angel (def. 1).
[1660–70; taken as singular of seraphim]
se•raph•ic (sɪˈræf ɪk) se•raph′i•cal, adj.
se•raph′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seraph - an angel of the first orderseraph - an angel of the first order; usually portrayed as the winged head of a child
angel - spiritual being attendant upon God
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مَلاك ذو سِتَّة أجْنِحَه
serafín
seraf
serafi
szeráf
serafi
serafimas
serafs
serafín
en yüksek sınıftan melek

seraph

[ˈserəf] N (seraphs or seraphim (pl)) [ˈserəfɪm]serafín m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

seraph

n pl <-s or -im> → Seraph m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

seraph

[ˈsɛrəf] n (seraphs or seraphim (pl)) → serafino
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

seraph

(ˈserəf) plurals ˈseraphim (-fim) ˈseraphs noun
an angel of the highest rank.
seˈraphic (-ˈrӕ-) adjective
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
I was a child and She was a child, In this kingdom by the sea, But we loved with a love that was more than love - I and my ANNABEL LEE - With a love that the wingéd seraphs of Heaven Coveted her and me.
With a love that the winged seraphs of heaven Coveted her and me.
This seraph band, each waved his hand: It was a heavenly sight!
She was dressed in the sweetest dress of pale-pink organdy, with dozens of frills and elbow sleeves, and she looked just like a seraph. I really think I'd like to be a minister's wife when I grow up, Marilla.
who now beholds Cherube and Seraph rowling in the Flood With scatter'd Arms and Ensigns, till anon His swift pursuers from Heav'n Gates discern Th' advantage, and descending tread us down Thus drooping, or with linked Thunderbolts Transfix us to the bottom of this Gulfe.
The morse bore a seraph's head in gold-thread raised work.
We are, and must be, one and all, burdened with faults in this world: but the time will soon come when, I trust, we shall put them off in putting off our corruptible bodies; when debasement and sin will fall from us with this cumbrous frame of flesh, and only the spark of the spirit will remain,--the impalpable principle of light and thought, pure as when it left the Creator to inspire the creature: whence it came it will return; perhaps again to be communicated to some being higher than man--perhaps to pass through gradations of glory, from the pale human soul to brighten to the seraph! Surely it will never, on the contrary, be suffered to degenerate from man to fiend?
"Bribe a seraph to fetch you a coal of fire from heaven, if you will," said I, "and with it kindle life in the tallest, fattest, most boneless, fullest-blooded of Ruben's painted women--leave me only my Alpine peri, and I'll not envy you."