sergeant


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Related to sergeant: Military ranks, John Sergeant

ser·geant

 (sär′jənt)
n.
1.
a. A noncommissioned rank in the US Army or Marine Corps that is above corporal and below staff sergeant.
b. Any of several ranks of noncommissioned officers in the US Army, Air Force, or Marine Corps: master gunnery sergeant; staff sergeant.
c. One who holds any of these ranks.
2.
a. The rank of police officer next below a captain, lieutenant, or inspector.
b. A police officer holding this rank.
3. A sergeant at arms.

[Middle English sergeaunte, a common soldier, from Old French sergent, from Medieval Latin serviēns, servient-, servant, soldier, from Late Latin, public official, from Latin, present participle of servīre, to serve, from servus, slave.]

ser′gean·cy, ser′geant·ship′ n.

sergeant

(ˈsɑːdʒənt)
n
1. (Military) a noncommissioned officer in certain armed forces, usually ranking above a corporal
2. (Law)
a. (in Britain) a police officer ranking between constable and inspector
b. (in the US) a police officer ranking below a captain
3. (Historical Terms) See sergeant at arms
4. (Law) a court or municipal officer who has ceremonial duties
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a court or municipal officer who has ceremonial duties
6. (Historical Terms) (formerly) a tenant by military service, not of knightly rank
7. (Law) See serjeant at law
Also: serjeant
[C12: from Old French sergent, from Latin serviēns, literally: serving, from servīre to serve]
sergeancy, ˈsergeantship n

ser•geant

(ˈsɑr dʒənt)

n.
1.
a. a noncommissioned officer in the U.S. Army and Marine Corps ranking above a corporal.
b. an officer of similar rank in the armed services of other countries.
2. any noncommissioned officer in the U.S. Air Force above the rank of airman first class or senior airman.
3. a police officer ranking immediately below a captain or a lieutenant in the U.S. and immediately below an inspector in Britain.
4. an officer at the court of a monarch: sergeant of the larder.
7. (formerly) a tenant by military service, below the rank of knight.
Also, esp. Brit., serjeant.
[1150–1200; < Old French sergent < Latin servientem, acc. of serviēns, present participle of servīre. See serve, -ent]
ser′gean•cy (-dʒən si) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sergeant - any of several noncommissioned officer ranks in the Army or Air Force or Marines ranking above a corporalsergeant - any of several noncommissioned officer ranks in the Army or Air Force or Marines ranking above a corporal
color sergeant - a sergeant in a color guard who carries one of the colors
first sergeant, sergeant first class - a sergeant in the Army above the rank of staff sergeant and below master sergeant
gunnery sergeant - a noncommissioned officer ranking above a staff sergeant in the marines
master sergeant - a senior noncommissioned officer in the Army or Marines
enlisted officer, noncom, noncommissioned officer - a military officer appointed from enlisted personnel
recruiting-sergeant - a sergeant deputized to enlist recruits
senior master sergeant, SMSgt - a senior noncommissioned officer in the Air Force with a rank comparable to master sergeant in the Army
command sergeant major, sergeant major - a noncommissioned officer serving as chief administrative officer of a headquarters unit of the Army
staff sergeant - a noncommissioned officer ranking above corporal and below sergeant first class in the Army or Marines or above airman 1st class in the Air Force
technical sergeant - a noncommissioned officer ranking below a master sergeant in the air force or marines
2.sergeant - a lawman with the rank of sergeantsergeant - a lawman with the rank of sergeant  
buck sergeant - a sergeant of the lowest rank in the military
desk sergeant, deskman, station keeper - the police sergeant on duty in a police station
law officer, lawman, peace officer - an officer of the law
3.sergeant - an English barrister of the highest rank
barrister - a British or Canadian lawyer who speaks in the higher courts of law on behalf of either the defense or prosecution
Translations
رُتْبَة رَقيب في الجَيْشرُتْبَة رَقيب في الشُّرْطَهرَقِيب
četařseržant
overbetjentsergent
kersantti
narednik
aîstoîarvarîstjóriliîòjálfi
軍曹
중사
seržantasviršila
seržants
čatár
narednik
sergeant
จ่า
çavuşkomiser muaviniüstçavuş
trung sỹ

sergeant

[ˈsɑːdʒənt]
A. N
1. (Mil) → sargento mf
yes, sergeantsí, mi sargento
2. (Pol) → oficial mf de policía
B. CPD sergeant major Nsargento mf mayor

sergeant

[ˈsɑːrənt] n
(in army)sergent m
(in police)brigadier msergeant-major [ˌsɑːrəntˈmeɪdʒər] n
(British)sergent-major m
(US)adjudant-chef m

sergeant

n (Mil) → Feldwebel(in) m(f); (Police) → Polizeimeister(in) m(f); sergeant at arms (Hist) → Waffenmeister m; (Brit, Parl) → Exekutivbeamte(r) m/-beamtin fdes Parlaments

sergeant

[ˈsɑːdʒnt] n (Mil) → sergente m (Police) → brigadiere m

sergeant

(ˈsaːdʒənt) noun
(often abbreviated to Sgt).
1. in the British army or air force, the rank above corporal. Sergeant Brown.
2. (a police officer of) the rank next above constable or patrolman.
sergeant-ˈmajor noun
(often abbreviated to Sgt-Maj.) in the British army, the highest rank of non-commissioned officer. Sergeant-Major Brown.

sergeant

رَقِيب seržant overbetjent Feldwebel λοχίας sargento kersantti sergent narednik sergente 軍曹 중사 sergeant sersjant sierżant sargento сержант sergeant จ่า çavuş trung sỹ 警官
References in classic literature ?
The name of him was Sergeant Cuff; and the arrival of him from London might be expected by the morning train.
It seems that he had heard some curious anecdotes about Sergeant Cuff, from his father's lawyer, during his stay in London.
Excuse me, ladies and gentleman," said the sergeant, "but as I have mentioned at the door to this smart young shaver" (which he hadn't), "I am on a chase in the name of the king, and I want the blacksmith.
Missis," returned the gallant sergeant, "speaking for myself, I should reply, the honour and pleasure of his fine wife's acquaintance; speaking for the king, I answer, a little job done.
It was at eleven forty-five that the first alarm reached the small local police station, in charge of Sergeant Wilson of the Sussex Constabulary.
On reaching the Manor House, the sergeant had found the drawbridge down, the windows lighted up, and the whole household in a state of wild confusion and alarm.
Some loose boards laid upon the ties supporting the rails of the railway supplied a footing for him and his executioners -- two private soldiers of the Federal army, directed by a sergeant who in civil life may have been a deputy sheriff.
The sergeant turned to the captain, saluted and placed himself immediately behind that officer, who in turn moved apart one pace.
My officer," said the sergeant, "it is not permitted to stop here.
This was a Polish sergeant of Poniatowski's corps, who explained in Polish that he had come over because he had been slighted in the service: that he ought long ago to have been made an officer, that he was braver than any of them, and so he had left them and wished to pay them out.
The first sergeant of Lieutenant Dudley's company stepped to the front and began to name the men in alphabetical order.
It was seven o'clock in the morning, the first rays of day lightened the pools of the marsh, in which the sun was reflected like a red ball, when Athos, awaking and opening the window of his bed-chamber, which looked out upon the banks of the river, perceived, at fifteen paces' distance from him, the sergeant and the men who had accompanied him the evening before, and who, after having deposited the casks at his house, had returned to the camp by the causeway on the right.