acinus

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ac·i·nus

 (ăs′ə-nəs)
n. pl. ac·i·ni (-nī′)
One of the small saclike dilations composing a compound gland.

[Latin, berry.]

a·cin′ic (ə-sĭn′ĭk), ac′i·nous adj.

acinus

(ˈæsɪnəs)
n, pl -ni (-ˌnaɪ)
1. (Anatomy) anatomy any of the terminal saclike portions of a compound gland
2. (Botany) botany any of the small drupes that make up the fruit of the blackberry, raspberry, etc
3. botany obsolete a collection of berries, such as a bunch of grapes
[C18: New Latin, from Latin: grape, berry]
acinic, ˈacinous, ˈacinose adj

ac•i•nus

(ˈæs ə nəs)

n., pl. -ni (-ˌnaɪ)
1. a small, rounded form, as a lobule, sac, seed, or berry.
2. the smallest secreting portion of a gland.
[1725–35; < Latin: grape, berry, seed of a berry]
ac′i•nar (-nər, -ˌnɑr) a•cin•ic (əˈsɪn ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acinus - one of the small drupes making up an aggregate or multiple fruit like a blackberryacinus - one of the small drupes making up an aggregate or multiple fruit like a blackberry
drupelet - a small part of an aggregate fruit that resembles a drupe
2.acinus - one of the small sacs or saclike dilations in a compound glandacinus - one of the small sacs or saclike dilations in a compound gland
gland, secreter, secretor, secretory organ - any of various organs that synthesize substances needed by the body and release it through ducts or directly into the bloodstream
sac - a structure resembling a bag in an animal
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In reactions with PNA serous acinus (+), UEA-I mucous corpus (+), WGA serous acinus (+), Con-A mucous corpus (+), WGA and PNA showed moderate (+) reactivity while RCA-I and Con-A showed intense (+) reaction in flushing channels (Hirshberg et al.).
In the submandibular glands, changes in the atrophic sinuses, from serous acinus and pyknotic nuclei, were significant in some gland epithelial cells.
Each serous acinus was determined randomly by systematic sample method, moving the microscope stage left to right, in a stepwise way.