servantless

servantless

(ˈsɜːvəntlɪs)
adj
without servants; not having a servant or servants
References in periodicals archive ?
However, this is not just class nostalgia, for it is not only a changed, servantless world that the war has left behind but a ghostly one as well, haunted by the spectre of "some former cook--Mrs Abbey, perhaps,.
Camping became a reassuringly traditional platform on which to audition modern family arrangements, like the servantless household, the corsetless woman, the suburban backyard.
Here's what I had to say about this groundbreaking book in our 25th anniversary issue:""This is a book for the servantless American cook.
Hearing him try to convince me he's just an ordinary guy and not really the Iron Chancellor, was nearly as sick-making as David Cameron's attempts to show he spends ALL his spare time at the kitchen sink in a servantless house.
Hearing him try to convince me he's just an ordinary guy and not really the Iron Chancellor was nearly as sick-making as Tony Blair coming out to cameras clutching his coffee mug or David Cameron's attempts to show he spends ALL his spare time at the kitchen sink in a servantless house.
41) It is not insignificant in this context that, unlike Constance Garnett and her sisters Clementina and Grace two decades earlier, for example, whose servantless dwelling had become a matter of some interest to their fellow activists, it was unthinkable for Woolf to go so far as to live without domestic staff.
Brereton contended that by adapting or abolishing the basement, and using gas appliances throughout the house, domestic labour could be reduced substantially for either the servantless housewife or the mistress with a small staff.
While middle-class housewives were being sold the latest in electrical gadgetry as necessities of the modern servantless home, working-class and farm women were still being given instructions on making soap, doing laundry manually with minimum effort, and organizing housework on a weekly, not daily, schedule.
Magazines were the main source of information on new domestic ideas and innovations, but they were also backed up by books such as The Servantless House in 1920 which told women that the answer to the vanishing maids lay with `the equipment of the house rather than with details of any daily arrangement of work'.
One reason is that the mistress of the house has much more to do with the kitchen in these servantless days than she had heretofore.
As Life magazine put it in 1958, "In America's suburban, servantless society, the housewife has neither the time nor the opportunity to go from meat market to bakery to confectionery.
Rybczynski considers the first decades of this century, when home design allowed residents "commodity and delight' and electricity allowed women to run efficient, servantless households, as a high point in comfort.