serviceberry


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ser·vice·ber·ry

 (sûr′vĭs-bĕr′ē)
n.
1. Any of various shrubs or trees of the genus Amelanchier of the rose family, chiefly found in North America, having clusters of white flowers and edible red to dark purple fruit. Also called service tree, shadblow, shadbush.
2. The berrylike fruit of this tree. In both senses also called juneberry, shadberry.

serviceberry

(ˈsɜːvɪsˌbɛrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Plants) Also called: shadbush or shadblow any of various North American rosaceous trees or shrubs of the genus Amelanchier, esp A. canadensis, which has white flowers and edible purplish berries
2. (Plants) the fruit of any of these plants
3. (Plants) the fruit of the service tree
Also called (for senses 1, 2): shadberry or Juneberry
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.serviceberry - any of various North American trees or shrubs having showy white flowers and edible blue-black or purplish fruitserviceberry - any of various North American trees or shrubs having showy white flowers and edible blue-black or purplish fruit
shadberry, juneberry, saskatoon, serviceberry - edible purple or red berries
Amelanchier, genus Amelanchier - North American deciduous trees or shrubs
alderleaf Juneberry, alder-leaved serviceberry, Amelanchier alnifolia - shrub or small tree of northwestern North America having fragrant creamy white flowers and small waxy purple-red fruits
Amelanchier bartramiana, Bartram Juneberry - open-growing shrub of eastern North America having pure white flowers and small waxy almost black fruits
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
2.serviceberry - edible purple or red berries
berry - any of numerous small and pulpy edible fruits; used as desserts or in making jams and jellies and preserves
Juneberry, serviceberry, shadblow, shadbush, service tree - any of various North American trees or shrubs having showy white flowers and edible blue-black or purplish fruit
References in periodicals archive ?
* COMMON SERVICEBERRY (Amelanchier arboreal - pileated woodpecker, Eastern bluebird, black-capped chickadee, tufted titmouse
* Plants can also serve to add function to the space, especially with plants like an apple serviceberry, which provides delicious edible berries in addition to it's spring blooms and great fall color.
In addition, serviceberry (Amelanchier sp.), another animal-dispersed species that grows as an understory tree in many upland forest types in the region, was recorded in 1983,1988, and 1999.
And it was called "serviceberry tree," because it bloomed when the ground was no longer frozen, and it was time to bury the dead and hold a service.
Native bear foods are abundant across the landscape and include pinyon pine, Utah juniper, gambel oak (Quercus gambelii), Rocky Mountain juniper (Juniperus scopulorum), Utah serviceberry (Amelanchier utahensis), scrub oak (Quercus turbinella), narrowleaf yucca (Yucca angustissima), banana yucca (Y.
For example, in certain portions of western Colorado and Utah, moose have also colonized upland shrub communities including oakbrush (Quercus spp.), serviceberry (Amelanchier spp.), and mountain mahogany (Cercocarpus spp).
The wildflower garden, two acres in the River Meadow, showcases many examples of native flora to the Pacific Northwest, including vine maple, mock orange, Pacific serviceberry, Douglas spiraea, Western azalea, red-flowering currant, larkspur, Western columbine, camas, Pacific trillium and wild iris.
Common vegetation species in this ecoregion include mountain big sagebrush, snowberry Symphoricarpos spp., serviceberry Amelanchier spp., mountain mahogany Cercocarpus spp., aspen Populus tremuloides, limber pine Pinus flexilis, vetch, clover, lupine Lupinus spp., prairie junegrass, bluebunch wheatgrass and western wheatgrass (Chapman et al.
Standouts among the trees that put their efforts into showy insect-pollinated flowers include the early-blooming shadbush or serviceberry, the flowering dogwood, redbud, tuliptree and the umbrella magnolia.
The site was north-facing within an old seed-tree cut now dominated by a mixed stand of young Western Larch, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa), with a shrub layer including alder (Alnus sp.), Saskatoon Serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia), Mallow-leaf Ninebark (Physocarpus malvaceus), and Rocky Mountain Maple (Acer glabrum).
Here--touching the buds on a tree--is serviceberry, named because it's one of the first wildflowers to bloom in spring, so pioneers used it in wedding-service bouquets.