servile work

servile work

n
(Roman Catholic Church) RC Church work of a physical nature that is forbidden on Sundays and on certain holidays
References in periodicals archive ?
While Price acknowledges that the notion of human dignity undergirds human rights law, he does not examine the status of the servile work and squalid living conditions he describes within that body of law.
The contentious question was bridged in 1940 of whether knitting could be called servile work and therefore was forbidden on Sundays.
The leisurely gaze requires two things: homelessness and freedom from "servile work." Only the homeless, the wayfarers, have the sense of wonder necessary "to preserve our apprehension of the universality of things in the midst of the habits of daily life, and to see 'the world' above and beyond our immediate environment" (122).
As the protagonist-narrator himself phrases it, "I put up with tedious, servile work without a word of protest." Subsequently, deprived of an "active" part, his becomes tedious, boring.
I prepare each dish to reach the mind through every possible channel.' (One thinks of the eucharistic motif in the film "Babette's Feast." For the young Triton, cooking is not servile work, but an act of transforming the Buddhist obligation of almsgiving into something edible.