sessile


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Related to sessile: sessile polyp, sessile lesion
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sessile
sessile leaf

ses·sile

 (sĕs′īl′, -əl) Biology
adj.
1. Permanently attached or fixed; not free-moving: sessile marine invertebrates.
2. Stalkless and attached directly at the base: sessile leaves.

[Latin sessilis, low, of sitting, from sessus, past participle of sedēre, to sit; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

ses·sil′i·ty (sĕ-sĭl′ĭ-tē) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sessile

(ˈsɛsaɪl)
adj
1. (Botany) (of flowers or leaves) having no stalk; growing directly from the stem
2. (Zoology) (of animals such as the barnacle) permanently attached to a substratum
[C18: from Latin sēssilis concerning sitting, from sedēre to sit]
sessility n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ses•sile

(ˈsɛs ɪl, -aɪl)

adj.
1. Bot. attached by the base, or without any distinct projecting support, as a leaf issuing directly from the main stem.
2. Zool. permanently attached; not freely moving.
[1715–25; < Latin sessilis low enough to sit on, dwarfish]
ses•sil•i•ty (sɛˈsɪl ɪ ti) n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ses·sile

(sĕs′īl′)
1. Zoology Permanently attached or fixed; not free-moving: Corals and mussels are sessile animals.
2. Botany Stalkless and attached directly at the base: sessile leaves; sessile fruit.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sessile - permanently attached to a substrate; not free to move about; "sessile marine animals and plants"
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
vagile - having freedom to move about; "vagile aquatic animals"
2.sessile - attached directly by the base; not having an intervening stalk; "sessile flowers"; "the shell of a sessile barnacle is attached directly to a substrate"
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
pedunculate, stalked - having or growing on or from a peduncle or stalk; "a pedunculate flower"; "a pedunculate barnacle is attached to the substrate by a fleshy foot or stalk"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

sessile

[ˈsesaɪl] ADJsésil
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

sessile

adj (Bot) → festgewachsen, sessil (spec)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

sessile

[ˈsɛsaɪl] adj (Bot) → sessile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ses·sile

a. sésil, insertado o fijo en una base ancha que carece de pedúnculo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
The opercular valves of sessile cirripedes (rock barnacles) are, in every sense of the word, very important structures, and they differ extremely little even in different genera; but in the several species of one genus, Pyrgoma, these valves present a marvellous amount of diversification: the homologous valves in the different species being sometimes wholly unlike in shape; and the amount of variation in the individuals of several of the species is so great, that it is no exaggeration to state that the varieties differ more from each other in the characters of these important valves than do other species of distinct genera.
According to Utz (2007), living hosts often represent a suitable attachment site for peritrichs and other sessile organisms, because the water currents passing by the host can supply the epibionts with food particles and can facilitate the removal of waste material.
Of the broadleaves, priority has been given to local species such as sessile oak, Turkey oak, linden, birch, maple, and ash, which are well-adapted to specific conditions and are resistant to fire and natural disasters.
Biofilms can be defined as irreversibly surface-attached communities of cells (sessile cells) embedded in a self-produced exopolymeric matrix, displaying a distinctive phenotype compared to their free-floating (planktonic cells) counterparts [4].
We reclassified 1 mucosal prolapse, 1 hyperplastic polyp, and 1 inflammatory polyp, as leiomyoma, sessile serrated adenoma, and tubular adenoma, respectively.
These microorganisms adapt to stressful environments by attaching to abiotic surfaces and forming a biofilm--a highly structured community of sessile cells embedded within a matrix of extracellular polymeric substance--and biofilm formation plays a critical role in colonization of catheters.
As a result, the balance tipped in favour of the less-dominant species, the more drought-tolerant sessile oak, the researchers from the University of Stirling and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) found.
The eight papers in this collection survey current knowledge on evaporative self-assembly, drying a sessile droplet to form a pattern, the convective assembly process, dip coating, breath figure template assembly, and surface controlled dewetting.
1 and 2) showed multiple sessile polypoidal lesions (arrows) of varying sizes seen in jejunal loops.
Sessile House at Naturally Woodlands, Brynna, is one of four properties currently available in the first stage of the development.
Based on prescribed time-course schedules, biostuds are periodically removed and transported to a laboratory where the sessile bacterial strains infesting the internal line are identified and characterized.
Short title: Competition and mortality in two sessile oak-dominated stands