sessile oak


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Related to sessile oak: Durmast Oak, English oak, pedunculate oak

sessile oak


[From its stalkless acorns.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sessile oak

n
(Plants) another name for the durmast1
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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"Sessile oak, downy birch, rowan, hazel, wild cherry - even the names are beautiful," said Gillian, Wales' national poet "Already the first leaves are opening.
"The roof I'm assuming is oak and there's plenty of oak available, including sessile oak which is long, straight-stemmed oak trees that they will need for these sort of projects," he said.
2016: The impact of seed predation and browsing on natural sessile oak regeneration under different light conditions in an over-aged coppice stand.
Situated next to the Sessile Oak, the car park has 450 spaces and will also cost [pounds sterling]10 per car.
The tree, a European sessile oak, which comes from the site of the Battle of Belleau Wood, is a gift from Macron.
Macron and the First Lady traveled to Washington with a 4.5 foot tall sapling European Sessile Oak that originated from Belleau Woods, a historic landmark tied to the US entry into World War I.
XtraVan chips add notes of vanilla and "extend generosity and roundness on the palate." The chips are produced with mainly French sessile oak and some American white oak, and are best used for long seasoning.
East Hill Woods, Churchfield and Bromley Park have already been involved and a native Sessile Oak is to be planted at Clayton West Millennium Green at 10.30am on Thursday, March 22.
Parts of these woods are so untouched, the hazel and sessile oak are thought to have been growing uninterrupted since the end of the last Ice Age.
Both native species are at risk - English oak and sessile oak, the national tree of Wales and Ireland.