sessile

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sessile
sessile leaf

ses·sile

 (sĕs′īl′, -əl) Biology
adj.
1. Permanently attached or fixed; not free-moving: sessile marine invertebrates.
2. Stalkless and attached directly at the base: sessile leaves.

[Latin sessilis, low, of sitting, from sessus, past participle of sedēre, to sit; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

ses·sil′i·ty (sĕ-sĭl′ĭ-tē) n.

sessile

(ˈsɛsaɪl)
adj
1. (Botany) (of flowers or leaves) having no stalk; growing directly from the stem
2. (Zoology) (of animals such as the barnacle) permanently attached to a substratum
[C18: from Latin sēssilis concerning sitting, from sedēre to sit]
sessility n

ses•sile

(ˈsɛs ɪl, -aɪl)

adj.
1. Bot. attached by the base, or without any distinct projecting support, as a leaf issuing directly from the main stem.
2. Zool. permanently attached; not freely moving.
[1715–25; < Latin sessilis low enough to sit on, dwarfish]
ses•sil•i•ty (sɛˈsɪl ɪ ti) n.

ses·sile

(sĕs′īl′)
1. Zoology Permanently attached or fixed; not free-moving: Corals and mussels are sessile animals.
2. Botany Stalkless and attached directly at the base: sessile leaves; sessile fruit.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sessile - permanently attached to a substrate; not free to move about; "sessile marine animals and plants"
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
vagile - having freedom to move about; "vagile aquatic animals"
2.sessile - attached directly by the base; not having an intervening stalk; "sessile flowers"; "the shell of a sessile barnacle is attached directly to a substrate"
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
pedunculate, stalked - having or growing on or from a peduncle or stalk; "a pedunculate flower"; "a pedunculate barnacle is attached to the substrate by a fleshy foot or stalk"
Translations

sessile

[ˈsesaɪl] ADJsésil

sessile

adj (Bot) → festgewachsen, sessil (spec)

sessile

[ˈsɛsaɪl] adj (Bot) → sessile

ses·sile

a. sésil, insertado o fijo en una base ancha que carece de pedúnculo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sentinel bivalves have been chosen historically due to their response to contaminants as "sponges," their sessility, their relatively large geographic range, and, in some cases, their substantive environmental eurytopy (Green et al.
The required biological properties for using an animal as a bioindicator can be summarised as: sessility or very low mobility; widespread distribution and abundance in the area that will be monitored; sampling ease; and capacity of filtration and accumulation of pollutants (Barbaro et al.
Much criticism of travel literature tends to contrast the mobility of the journey narrative with the perceived sessility of its domestic equivalent.