settledness

settledness

(ˈsɛtəldnəs)
n
the quality or condition of being settled
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Such impartiality or disinterestedness in the self (in securing/immunizing the self from exposure to otherness) is, as Panagia (2013) argues in a slightly different context, "to reclaim the intensity of experience in the face of its settledness" (p.
But this need not be so, for the truth predicate characterized by supervaluating over histories is equivalent to the settledness operator in the sense that whenever "It is settled that A" is true at a time t, so will be "It is true that A" and vice versa.
For Ruth the area is positioned as 'unusual' in terms of the continuity and settledness of its population, and similarly in Cath's excerpt, though individuals and families on the road on which she lives come and go, the family makeup and dynamic of the area, its familial continuity and stability, ultimately remains untouched.
I have used the notion of (hau)ontology to characterize the lack (which is not necessarily absence of) of settledness of such things in the kind of everyday life studied.
These early cases and writings created an aura of "settledness" around the question, though it had never actually been examined.
So much for settledness. And climate is less well understood than breast cancer.
Mansfield Park and Downton Abbey each work as metonyms for an entire way of life that must be preserved, a gracious life of nostalgically appealing settledness, belonging, and certainty.
"There's a real continuity and settledness around the club, sprinkle a goalscorer like Jelavic on top and things are good."
The second, third and fourth features seek to show whether age, educational level, occupation and length of residence and future plans about place of residence co-occur with linguistic needs and abilities and informants' sense of 'settledness'.
The absence of backward branching represents the settledness of the past.
Old Testament scholar Brueggemann plays out in detail the tension in the Hebrew scriptures between a feral God who wants relationship (but not domestication) and the people of God who want a static deity, a "king." The peoples' tendency toward settledness and a desire to "go it alone" lead to systems of defeat that can only be overturned by a dynamic agency outside those systems.
The church has been unmoored and should joyfully take leave of the settledness of Constantinian social arrangements that gave it privilege and power.