sex-


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sex-

pref.
Six: sexpartite.

[Latin, from sex, six; see s(w)eks in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sex-

combining form
six: sexcentennial.
[from Latin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sex

(sɛks)

n.
1. either the female or male division of a species, esp. as differentiated with reference to the reproductive functions.
2. the sum of the structural and functional differences by which the female and male are distinguished.
3. the instinct or attraction drawing one individual sexually toward another, or the cultural phenomena, behavior, or activities that it motivates.
v.t.
6. to ascertain the sex of, esp. of newly hatched chicks.
7. to arouse sexually (often fol. by up).
Idioms:
have sex, to engage in sexual relations, esp. sexual intercourse.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin sexus]

sex-

a combining form meaning “six”: sexdecillion.
[< Latin, comb. form of sex six]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Supporters of comprehensive sex-ed feel that if students are well-educated, they'll be empowered to make smart, healthy decisions about sex and their bodies.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirm, in fact, that when taught comprehensive sex-ed, 83 percent of teens wait longer to have sex compared with those who are taught abstinence-only.
They complained that an updated sex-ed curriculum "normalized" gay men and lesbians by implying that homosexuality is a biological trait.