sexton


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Related to sexton: Anne Sexton

sex·ton

 (sĕk′stən)
n.
An employee or officer of a church who is responsible for the care and upkeep of church property and sometimes for ringing bells and digging graves.

[Middle English sextein, from Anglo-Latin sextānus, probably from Medieval Latin secristānus, sacristan, variant of sacristānus; see sacristan.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sexton

(ˈsɛkstən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a person employed to act as caretaker of a church and its contents and graveyard, and often also as bell-ringer, gravedigger, etc
2. (Animals) another name for the burying beetle
[C14: from Old French secrestein, from Medieval Latin sacristānus sacristan]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sex•ton

(ˈsɛk stən)

n.
1. an official who maintains a church building and its contents, rings the bell, etc.
2. an official whose main duty is to maintain a synagogue and its religious articles.
[1275–1325; Middle English sexteyn, sekesteyn, syncopated variant of segerstane, secristeyn < Anglo-French segerstaine sacristan]
sex′ton•ship`, n.

Sex•ton

(ˈsɛk stən)

n.
Anne (Harvey), 1928–74, U.S. poet.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sexton - United States poet (1928-1974)
2.sexton - an officer of the church who is in charge of sacred objects
caretaker - a custodian who is hired to take care of something (property or a person)
church officer - a church official
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
قَنْدَلَفْت
kostelník
kirketjener
suntio
egyházfisekrestyés
kirkjuòjónn
zakristijonas
ķesteris
kostolník
kilise çancısızangoç

sexton

[ˈsekstən] Nsacristán m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

sexton

nKüster m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

sexton

[ˈsɛkstn] nsagrestano
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

sexton

(ˈsekstən) noun
a person who looks after a church and often is responsible for bellringing etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
In an old abbey town, down in this part of the country, a long, long while ago--so long, that the story must be a true one, because our great-grandfathers implicitly believed it--there officiated as sexton and grave-digger in the churchyard, one Gabriel Grub.
The old sexton, leaning on a crutch, was taking the air at his cottage door, and gave her good morrow.
The farmer's wife and the sexton sat at the table, but there was no one else.
On that same night--events so crowd upon each other in convulsed and distracted times, that more than the stirring incidents of a whole life often become compressed into the compass of four-and- twenty hours--on that same night, Mr Haredale, having strongly bound his prisoner, with the assistance of the sexton, and forced him to mount his horse, conducted him to Chigwell; bent upon procuring a conveyance to London from that place, and carrying him at once before a justice.
Before long the sexton came by and saw his master, the parson, running behind three girls.
The other looked towards the stone quarry in which the sexton's cottage was built.
But as he came down the pulpit steps, the grey-bearded sexton met him, holding up a black glove, which the minister recognised as his own.
The sexton stands waiting for us at the door of the tomb.
I got the sexton, who was digging Linton's grave, to remove the earth off her coffin lid, and I opened it.
Newland Archer, at a signal from the sexton, had come out of the vestry and placed himself with his best man on the chancel step of Grace Church.
Some man, apparently the sexton, had observed Clare standing there, and drew nigh.
I failed not to set my own heels at liberty by means of the fetter-key, which hung amongst others at the sexton's belt; and I had thoughts of beating out the knaves brains with the bunch of keys, but gratitude for the nook of pasty and the flask of wine which the rascal had imparted to my captivity, came over my heart; so, with a brace of hearty kicks, I left him on the floor, pouched some baked meat, and a leathern bottle of wine, with which the two venerable brethren had been regaling, went to the stable, and found in a private stall mine own best palfrey, which, doubtless, had been set apart for the holy Father Abbot's particular use.