shackles


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shackle
anchor shackle

shack·le

 (shăk′əl)
n.
1. A device, usually one of a pair connected to a chain, that encircles the ankle or wrist of a prisoner or captive.
2. A hobble for an animal.
3. Any of several devices, such as a clevis, used to fasten or couple.
4. often shackles A restraint or check on action or progress: "throwing off the puritanical shackles" (Ben Yagoda).
tr.v. shack·led, shack·ling, shack·les
1. To put shackles on (someone); confine with shackles.
2. To fasten or connect with a shackle.
3. To restrict, confine, or hamper. See Synonyms at hobble.

[Middle English schackel, from Old English sceacel, fetter.]

shack′ler n.
Translations
أغْلال، أصْفاد، قُيود
okovy
fodlænker
hlekkir
uždėti grandines
važas

shackles

[ˈʃækəlz] npl
(on prisoner)chaînes fpl, entraves fpl
(fig) (= restrictions) the shackles of the past → le joug du passé
to throw off the shackles of the past → se libérer du joug du passé

shackles

[ˈʃæklz] nplceppi mpl, ferri mpl (fig) (constraints) → impacci mpl

shackles

(ˈʃӕklz) noun plural
a pair of iron rings joined by a chain that are put on a prisoner's wrists, ankles etc, to limit movement. His captors put shackles on him.
ˈshackle verb
to put shackles on.
References in classic literature ?
Of late these shackles, if I mistake not, have been broken; and octennial parliaments have besides been established.
After having so nobly disentangled themselves from the shackles of Parental Authority, by a Clandestine Marriage, they were determined never to forfeit the good opinion they had gained in the World, in so doing, by accepting any proposals of reconciliation that might be offered them by their Fathers--to this farther tryal of their noble independance however they never were exposed.
But the most ordinary cause of a single life, is liberty, especially in certain self-pleasing and humorous minds, which are so sensible of every restraint, as they will go near to think their girdles and garters, to be bonds and shackles. Unmarried men are best friends, best masters, best servants; but not always best subjects; for they are light to run away; and almost all fugitives, are of that condition.
"In the end he managed to knock both shackles out and raise the staysail and jib, and the Duchess filled away for the entrance.
I tell thee, shackles and the prison-house shall punish the next offence of this kind.''
"Yes," she said, "but now it no longer shackles him.
Fourth of July was coming; but he soon gave that up -- gave it up before he had worn his shackles over forty-eight hours -- and fixed his hopes upon old Judge Frazer, justice of the peace, who was apparently on his deathbed and would have a big public funeral, since he was so high an official.
Don Quixote, who was not used to dismount without having the stirrup held, fancying that Sancho had by this time come to hold it for him, threw himself off with a lurch and brought Rocinante's saddle after him, which was no doubt badly girthed, and saddle and he both came to the ground; not without discomfiture to him and abundant curses muttered between his teeth against the unlucky Sancho, who had his foot still in the shackles. The duke ordered his huntsmen to go to the help of knight and squire, and they raised Don Quixote, sorely shaken by his fall; and he, limping, advanced as best he could to kneel before the noble pair.
The circumstances that endanger the safety of nations are infinite, and for this reason no constitutional shackles can wisely be imposed on the power to which the care of it is committed.
He is of the same mind as the old poet Davenant who thought it folly to take away the liberty of a poet and fetter his feet in the shackles of an historian.
"Clocks," said the Prince, "are shackles on the feet of mankind.
The scales will fall from his eyes, the shackles will be torn from his limbs--he will leap up with a cry of thankfulness, he will stride forth a free man at last!