shading

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shad·ing

 (shā′dĭng)
n.
1. A screening against light or heat.
2. The lines or other marks used to fill in outlines of a sketch, engraving, or painting to represent gradations of color or darkness.
3. A small variation, gradation, or difference.

shading

(ˈʃeɪdɪŋ)
n
(Art Terms) the graded areas of tone, lines, dots, etc, indicating light and dark in a painting or drawing

shad•ing

(ˈʃeɪ dɪŋ)

n.
1. a slight variation or difference of color, character, etc.
2. the representation of the different values of color or light and dark in a painting or drawing.
[1605–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shading - graded markings that indicate light or shaded areas in a drawing or paintingshading - graded markings that indicate light or shaded areas in a drawing or painting
marking - a pattern of marks
crosshatch, hachure, hatch, hatching - shading consisting of multiple crossing lines
2.shading - a gradation involving small or imperceptible differences between grades
gradation, graduation - the act of arranging in grades
Translations
تَدَرُّج الألوان، حَجْب، سَتْر، تَظْليل
stíny
skravering
árnyékolás
skygging
tiene
gölgelen me

shading

[ˈʃeɪdɪŋ] N
1. [of colour] → sombreado m
2. (fig) [of meaning] → matiz m

shading

[ˈʃeɪdɪŋ] n
(= area coloured darker) → ombres fpl
(= material providing shade) → filets mpl d'ombrage

shading

n (= shaded area)Schraffierung f, → Schraffur f; (Art) → Schattierung f

shading

[ˈʃeɪdɪŋ] n
a. (in drawing, painting) → ombreggiatura
b. (gradation) → sfumatura

shade

(ʃeid) noun
1. slight darkness caused by the blocking of some light. I prefer to sit in the shade rather than the sun.
2. the dark parts of a picture. light and shade in a portrait.
3. something that screens or shelters from light or heat. a large sunshade; a shade for a light.
4. a variety of a colour; a slight difference. a pretty shade of green; shades of meaning.
5. a slight amount. The weather is a shade better today.
verb
1. (sometimes with from) to shelter from light or heat. He put up his hand to shade his eyes.
2. to make darker. You should shade the foreground of that drawing.
3. (with into) to change very gradually eg from one colour to another.
ˈshaded adjective
(of parts of a picture) made darker.
shades noun plural
(especially American) sunglasses.
ˈshading noun
(in a picture etc) the marking that shows the darker parts.
ˈshady adjective
1. sheltered or giving shelter from heat or light. a shady tree; a shady corner of the garden.
2. dishonest. a shady business.
ˈshadiness noun
put in the shade
to cause to seem unimportant. She is so beautiful that she puts her sister in the shade.
References in classic literature ?
On the level land the tracks had almost disappeared--were mere shadings in the grass, and a stranger would not have noticed them.
Then seating himself before it, you would have seen him intently study the various lines and shadings which there met his eye; and with slow but steady pencil trace additional courses over spaces that before were blank.
By this time all the Queen's scholars had gravitated into their own places in the ranks and the various classes had assumed distinct and settled shadings of individuality.
Perhaps that was why her voice and words had such a charm, conveying to the listeners' perception such fine shadings of meaning and tint and music.
I gather the larkspur Over the hillside, Blown mid the chaos Of boulder and bellbine; Hating the tyrant Who made me an outcast, Who of his leisure Now spares me no moment: Drinking the mountain spring, Shading at noon-day Under the cypress My limbs from the sun glare.
Again, when I am in the company of one of my two hexagonal Grandsons, contemplating one of his sides (AB) full front, it will be evident from the accompanying diagram that I shall see one whole line (AB) in comparative brightness (shading off hardly at all at the ends) and two smaller lines (CA and BD) dim throughout and shading away into greater dimness towards the extremities C and D.
Ashmore looked upward, shading his eyes with his hat held between them and the lantern.
And as she blows, and shading it with her lean hand, concentrates its red spark of light, it serves in the dim morning as a lamp to show him what he sees of her.
There is a figure we know well, just come out of the house, and shading her eyes with her hands as she looks for something in the distance, for the rays that fall on her white borderless cap and her pale auburn hair are very dazzling.
The short, round-shouldered Captain Tushin, stumbling over the tail of the gun carriage, moved forward and, not noticing the general, looked out shading his eyes with his small hand.
He found his father in the garden shading his eyes from the sun.
He who came upon him so unexpectedly was about to break his rest by thrusting him with his foot, when, glancing at his upturned face, he arrested himself in the very action, and stooping down and shading the candle with his hand, examined his features closely.