shake down


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shake

 (shāk)
v. shook (sho͝ok), shak·en (shā′kən), shak·ing, shakes
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to move from side to side or up and down with jerky movements: I shook the juice container.
b. To cause to tremble, vibrate, or rock: The earthquake shook the ground. The wind shook the barley.
c. To brandish or wave, especially in anger: shake one's fist.
2.
a. To cause to lose stability or strength, as of conviction: a crisis that has shaken my deepest beliefs.
b. To disturb or agitate emotionally; upset or unnerve: She was shaken by the news of the disaster.
3.
a. To remove or dislodge by jerky movements: shook the dust from the cushions.
b. To scatter or strew by jerky movements: shook the salt on the popcorn.
c. To get rid of or put an end to: could not shake the feeling that things would not work out; wanted to shake his habit of snacking.
d. To get away from (a pursuer): couldn't shake the man who was following us.
e. To bring to a specified condition by or as if by shaking: "It is not easy to shake one's heart free of the impression" (John Middleton Murry).
4. To clasp (hands) in greeting or leave-taking or as a sign of agreement.
5. Music To trill (a note).
6. Games To rattle and mix (dice) before casting.
v.intr.
1. To move from side to side or up and down in short, irregular, often jerky movements: The trees shook in the wind.
2. To move something vigorously up and down or from side to side, as in mixing.
3. To tremble, as from cold or in anger.
4. To be unsteady; totter or waver.
5. Music To trill.
6. To shake hands: Let's shake on it.
n.
1. The act of shaking: gave the bottle a shake.
2. A trembling or quivering movement.
3. Informal An earthquake.
4.
a. A fissure in rock.
b. A crack in timber caused by wind or frost.
5. Informal A moment or instant: I'll do it in a shake.
6. Music A trill.
7.
a. See milkshake.
b. A beverage in which the ingredients are mixed by shaking.
8. A rough shingle used to cover rustic buildings, such as barns: cedar shakes.
9. shakes Informal Uncontrollable trembling, as in a person who is cold, frightened, feverish, or ill. Often used with the: was suffering from a bad case of the shakes.
10. Informal A bargain or deal: getting a fair shake.
Phrasal Verbs:
shake down
1. Slang To extort money from.
2. Slang To make a thorough search of: shook down the prisoners' cells for hidden weapons.
3. To subject (a new ship or aircraft) to shakedown testing.
4. To become acclimated or accustomed, as to a new environment or a new job.
shake off
To free oneself of; get rid of: We shook off our fears.
shake out
1. To come to pass; transpire; happen: Let's see how things shake out before we finalize our plans.
2. To straighten or extend by jerky movements: She took off her hat and shook out her hair.
shake up
1. To upset by or as if by a physical jolt or shock: was badly shaken up by the accident.
2. To subject to a drastic rearrangement or reorganization: new management bent on shaking up the company.
Idioms:
give (someone) the shake Slang
To escape from or get rid of: We managed to give our pursuers the shake.
no great shakes Slang
Unexceptional; ordinary: "stepping in between the victim and the bully, even when the victim happens to be no great shakes" (Louis Auchincloss).
shake a leg Informal
1. To dance.
2. To move quickly; hurry up.
shake (someone's) tree Slang
To arouse to action or reaction; disturb: "[He] so shook Hollywood's tree that ... all manner of ... people called me unsolicited to itemize his mistakes or praise his courage" (Tina Brown).
shake a stick at Slang
To point out, designate, or name: "All of a sudden there came into being a vast conservative infrastructure: think-tanks ... and more foundations than you could shake a stick at" (National Review).

[Middle English schaken, from Old English sceacan.]

shak′a·ble, shake′a·ble adj.
Synonyms: shake, tremble, quake, quiver1, shiver1, shudder
These verbs mean to manifest involuntary back-and-forth or up-and-down movement. Shake is the most general: My hand shook as I signed the mortgage. Tremble implies quick, rather slight movement, as from excitement, weakness, or anger: The speaker trembled as he denounced his opponents. Quake refers to more violent movement, as that caused by shock or upheaval: I was so scared that my legs began to quake. Quiver suggests a slight, rapid, tremulous movement: "Her lip quivered like that of a child about to cry" (Booth Tarkington).
Shiver involves rapid trembling, as of a person experiencing chill: "as I in hoary winter night stood shivering in the snow" (Robert Southwell).
Shudder applies chiefly to convulsive shaking caused by fear, horror, or revulsion: "She starts like one that spies an adder / ... The fear whereof doth make him shake and shudder" (Shakespeare). See Also Synonyms at agitate.

shake down

vb (adverb)
1. to fall or settle or cause to fall or settle by shaking
2. (tr) slang US to extort money from, esp by blackmail or threats of violence
3. (tr) slang US to search thoroughly
4. (Aeronautics) (tr) informal chiefly US to submit (a vessel, etc) to a shakedown test
5. (Nautical Terms) (tr) informal chiefly US to submit (a vessel, etc) to a shakedown test
6. (intr) to go to bed, esp to a makeshift bed
7. (intr) (of a person, animal, etc) to settle down
n
8. slang US a swindle or act of extortion
9. slang US a thorough search
10. a makeshift bed, esp of straw, blankets, etc
11. (Aeronautics) informal chiefly
a. a voyage to test the performance of a ship or aircraft or to familiarize the crew with their duties
b. (as modifier): a shakedown run.
12. (Nautical Terms) informal chiefly
a. a voyage to test the performance of a ship or aircraft or to familiarize the crew with their duties
b. (as modifier): a shakedown run.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

shake

verb
1. To cause to move to and fro with short, jerky movements:
2. To move to and fro in short, jerky movements:
3. To cause to move to and fro violently:
4. To move to and fro violently:
5. To alter the settled state or position of:
6. Slang. To free from or cast out something objectionable or undesirable:
7. Slang. To get away from (a pursuer):
Idiom: give someone the shake.
8. To impair or destroy the composure of.Also used with up:
Informal: rattle.
9. To deprive of courage or the power to act as a result of fear, anxiety, or disgust:
phrasal verb
shake down
1. Slang. To obtain by coercion or intimidation:
3. Slang. To examine the person or personal effects of in order to find something lost or concealed:
phrasal verb
shake off
1. To free from or cast out something objectionable or undesirable:
Slang: shake.
2. To get away from (a pursuer):
Slang: shake.
Idiom: give someone the shake.
noun
1. A nervous shaking of the body:
2. Informal. A shaking of the earth:
3. Informal. A state of nervous restlessness or agitation.Used in plural:
fidget (often used in plural), jitter (used in plural), jump (used in plural), shiver (used in plural), tremble (often used in plural).
Informal: all-overs.
Translations

w>shake down

vt sep
fruitherunterschütteln
(US inf: = extort money from) → ausnehmen (inf); to shake somebody down for 500 dollarsjdn um 500 Dollar erleichtern (inf)
(US inf: = search) → absuchen, durchsuchen (for nach)
vi (inf)
(= sleep)kampieren, sein Lager aufschlagen
(= settle, people) → sich eingewöhnen; (machinery)sich einlaufen; (situation)sich einspielen
References in classic literature ?
The night wind tells me secrets Of lotus lilies blue; And hour by hour the willows Shake down the chiming dew.
Yes; it needed a few days after the taking of your departure for a ship's company to shake down into their places, and for the soothing deep-water ship routine to establish its beneficent sway.
And they lie all tumbled about on the green, like the crab-apples that you shake down to your swine.
Just to have a roof over her until I find a room in the village where we can shake down.
Long gone are days of hurry, big band, double shots, back alley, breakfast at midnight, round the clock, round the bar, indigo, shotgun, shimmy, shake down.
There are four times more stop and searches by police on Scottish streets than in England, where officers require "reasonable suspicion" to shake down teenagers.
That's not a `We're trying to shake down a couple people for a traffic violation sort of operation.
That deal also required Seagal to seek a pardon for Nasso's 2003 conviction for trying to shake down the actor with the help of Mafia goons, for which Nasso served a year in jail.
Oddly enough there is one group of public sector workers who have managed to escape the great pension shake down.
Ponzo, allegedly to shake down someone aligned with Mr.
We are not complementing any major deal until we see the regulatory environment shake down and get more confidence that this current euphoria will produce sustainable real numbers,' Clark said, speaking at RBC Capital Markets (LSE: RY) (TSX: RY) Canadian Bank CEO Conference.
It's the best chance in my career, I'm racing for a full factory team on a machine that has proved to be very competitive during pre-season tests," said Haslam, as he prepared for a final shake down in tests on the Phillip Island circuit today.