shakuhachi


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shakuhachi

(ˌʃækʊˈhætʃɪ)
n
(Instruments) music a wooden Japanese end-blown flute with four holes in front and one at the back
References in periodicals archive ?
The jazz and soul funk saxophonist brings his band to the Halifax venue for an evening of music played on saxes, flutes, whistles and the ancient Japanese Shakuhachi.
In this way a clearing is made for the Chinese Pipa and Japanese Shakuhachi to become spiritual instruments.
The shamisen and the shakuhachi, along with many other musical instruments, have replicas in India and indeed in other countries along the Silk Road - Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, China and Korea.
At turns delicate and dramatic, it unites the taiko drums of Taikoz, the shakuhachi flute of Riley Lee, plus cello and classical Indian vocals with Lingalayams juxtaposing of the Bharatha Natyam and Kuchipudi dance styles.
Other opportunities to listen to contemporary music were afforded by the 10th International Shakuhachi Festival Prague.
It was a perfect counterpart to my study of the shakuhachi, the Japanese bamboo flute, long associated with Zen Buddhism and traditional Japanese culture.
Kakizakai with his Japanese flute, Shakuhachi, the morning became perfecto.
Other recent vocal works demonstrating the far-reaching experimentalism of the composer's work include Breathtails (13 Songs in 21 Breaths) for baritone, shakuhachi, and string quartet, and the one-woman cyborgopera, Sucktion.
beaucoup moins que] Wasanbom [beaucoup plus grand que], compose de Toen Hibiki au taiko (tambour), d'Akihito Obama au shakuhachi (flute) et Dai Yamamoto au shamisen (luth) animeront aussi un concert le 24 decembre a la salle du zenith Ahmed-Bey de Constantine.
Konstrukt's charms lay in its multi-instrumental kaleidoscope: A Turkish zurna, a Japanese Shakuhachi flute and a Spanish gralla (identical to the zurna) added considerable color to their garrulous wall of sound.
Building on the bright grins and overflowing energy of these young women and their chaperone, Masaki Nakamura followed on with the ethereal whistling of the Japanese-style flute, the shakuhachi.
The woman of the Heian period at several points in the play speaks this poetry, often accompanied by a shakuhachi flute: