shalt


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shalt

 (shălt)
aux.v. Archaic
A second person singular present tense of shall.

shalt

(ʃælt)
vb
archaic or dialect (used with the pronoun: thou or its relative equivalent) a singular form of the present tense (indicative mood) of shall

shalt

(ʃælt)

v.
Archaic. 2nd pers. sing. of shall.
References in classic literature ?
some pastime: sit down, and thou shalt behold the Seven Deadly
And thou shalt turn thyself into what shape thou wilt.
That thou shalt see presently: keep out of the circle,
On the trail that thou must tread To the thresholds of our dread, Where the Flower blossoms red; Through the nights when thou shalt lie Prisoned from our Mother-sky, Hearing us, thy loves, go by; In the dawns when thou shalt wake To the toil thou canst not break, Heartsick for the Jungle's sake: Wood and Water, Wind and Tree, Wisdom, Strength, and Courtesy, Jungle-Favour go with thee!
Thou at the sight Pleas'd, out of Heaven shalt look down and smile, While by thee rais'd I ruin all my Foes, Death last, and with his Carcass glut the Grave: Then with the multitude of my redeemd Shall enter Heaven long absent, and returne, Father, to see thy face, wherein no cloud Of anger shall remain, but peace assur'd, And reconcilement; wrauth shall be no more Thenceforth, but in thy presence Joy entire.
Nor shalt thou by descending to assume Mans Nature, less'n or degrade thine owne.
Nay, by my troth, thou gavest me a round knock,'' replied the Captain; ``do as much for this fellow, and thou shalt pass scot-free; and if thou dost not why, by my faith, as thou art such a sturdy knave, I think I must pay thy ransom myself.
Come on, churl, an thou darest: thou shalt feel the strength of a miller's thumb
At the entrance of the village, so says Cide Hamete, Don Quixote saw two boys quarrelling on the village threshing-floor one of whom said to the other, "Take it easy, Periquillo; thou shalt never see it again as long as thou livest.
Don Quixote heard this, and said he to Sancho, "Dost thou not mark, friend, what that boy said, 'Thou shalt never see it again as long as thou livest'?
He was answered by the one who had said, "Thou shalt never see it again as long as thou livest," that he had taken a cage full of crickets from the other boy, and did not mean to give it back to him as long as he lived.
So to the coast of Jordan he directs His easy steps, girded with snaky wiles, Where he might likeliest find this new-declared, This man of men, attested Son of God, Temptation and all guile on him to try-- So to subvert whom he suspected raised To end his reign on Earth so long enjoyed: But, contrary, unweeting he fulfilled The purposed counsel, pre-ordained and fixed, Of the Most High, who, in full frequence bright Of Angels, thus to Gabriel smiling spake:-- "Gabriel, this day, by proof, thou shalt behold, Thou and all Angels conversant on Earth With Man or men's affairs, how I begin To verify that solemn message late, On which I sent thee to the Virgin pure In Galilee, that she should bear a son, Great in renown, and called the Son of God.