shamefastness

shamefastness

(ˈʃeɪmˌfɑːstnəs)
n
1. the state or quality of being modest, shy, or bashful
2. the state of being shamefaced or full of shame
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
Which, like as in the first years of their childhood they make much and be fond and proud of such ornaments, so when they be a little more grown in years and discretion, perceiving that none but children do wear such toys and trifles, they lay them away even of their own shamefastness, without any bidding of their parents, even as our children when they wax big, do caste away nuts, brooches and dolls.
"shamefastness." To be full of shame, and holding tight to it.
Which, like as in the first years of their childhood they make much and be fond and proud of such ornaments, so when they be a little more grown in years and discretion, perceiving that none but children to wear such toys and trifles, they lay them away even of their own shamefastness, without any bidding of their parents, even as our children, when they wax big, do cast away nuts, brooches, and puppets (Moore, 1996:33-5)
3.4: Quam in omni vita servasti morum probitatem et verecundiam, in hac quoque re praestabis; est enim quaedam et dolendi modestia (The uprightness and shamefastness of character which you have preserved all your life you will exhibit also in this matter; for there is a certain modesty in grieving).
speech being as rare as precious; her silence without sullennness; her modesty full of wit, and a wit which delighted more to judge itself than to shew itself: her without affectation; her shamefastness without ignorance; in sum, one that to praise well, one must first set down with himself what it is to be excellent, for so she is.
Spenser makes much of the gaze, according to Krier, 157-63, dealing with "shamefastness" (shamefacedness).