shamefulness


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shame·ful

 (shām′fəl)
adj.
1.
a. Causing shame; disgraceful.
b. Giving offense; indecent.
2. Obsolete Full of shame; ashamed.

shame′ful·ly adv.
shame′ful·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shamefulness - unworthiness meriting public disgrace and dishonor
unworthiness - the quality or state of lacking merit or value
scandalousness - disgracefulness that offends public morality
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

shamefulness

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
خِزْي، إخْجال، إلحاق العار بِ
hanebnost
flovhed
skömm
utanmazlık

shamefulness

[ˈʃeɪmfʊlnɪs] Nvergüenza f, lo vergonzoso
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

shamefulness

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

shame

(ʃeim) noun
1. (often with at) an unpleasant feeling caused by awareness of guilt, fault, foolishness or failure. I was full of shame at my rudeness; He felt no shame at his behaviour.
2. dishonour or disgrace. The news that he had accepted bribes brought shame on his whole family.
3. (with a) a cause of disgrace or a matter for blame. It's a shame to treat a child so cruelly.
4. (with a) a pity. What a shame that he didn't get the job!
verb
1. (often with into) to force or persuade to do something by making ashamed. He was shamed into paying his share.
2. to cause to have a feeling of shame. His cowardice shamed his parents.
ˈshameful adjective
disgraceful. shameful behaviour.
ˈshamefully adverb
ˈshamefulness noun
ˈshameless adjective
1. without shame; blatant. a shameless liar; shameless deception.
2. not modest. a shameless woman.
ˈshamelessly adverb
ˈshamelessness noun
ˈshamefaced adjective
showing shame or embarrassment. He was very shamefaced about his mistake.
put to shame
to make feel ashamed of something or to make seem to be of poor quality by showing greater excellence. Your beautiful drawing puts me/mine to shame.
to my/his etc shame
it is a cause of shame to me, him etc that. To my shame, my daughter always beats me at chess.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Say, 'Allah does not command shamefulness'" (Al-A'raf, 7:28).
Leveling allegations against Pakistan without any proof or investigations is the height of shamefulness, he added.
But when the Germans are responsible for the murder of six million Jews, they used that term: "making it just again." This is "generous" only in its level of shamefulness.
Frederick Forsythe confirms this when he comments in the prologue of The Making of an African Legend: The Biafra Story (1977: 8): "But nothing can or ever will minimize the injustice and brutality perpetrated on the Biafran people, nor diminish the shamefulness of a British government's frantic, albeit indirect, participation"
A few days, weeks and even months after these stories were written I carried a lot of shamefulness around.
Ursula's mastery of the market and refusal to enact the shamefulness projected onto her body elevate her beyond property--somewhere near equal to the status of a man.
Much like Prudentius's Ira or Juan Ruiz's lion, her anger is displaced onto herself, placing all the blame on her moral flaws and shamefulness caused both by her sins and by Panfilo's abandonment.
This finding suggests that counselors working with clients with TTM might benefit from attending to clients' feelings of shamefulness surrounding their inability to "just stop pulling" (Penzel, 2003).
Studies on mathematics anxiety reported two primary implications for pre-service and in-service teachers: a) mathematically anxious individuals lack the ability to do well in mathematics, have lower mathematics achievements, avoid mathematics classes, have limited college majors and career choices, and experience guilty feelings and shamefulness (Ma, 1999), b) pre-service teachers who experience mathematics anxiety, have lower self-efficacy concerning their effectiveness as mathematics teachers (Hadfield 1994).
Blaming and pressurizing the women instead of the offender gives the criminal more vigour to continue his acts of shamefulness.
In Karachi nevertheless, Hiroko feels her appearance and behaviour is a source of shamefulness for her son.
(234) The mere presence of the penalties sent an important signal of deterrence and of the shamefulness of the conduct.