shape-note singing

shape-note singing

(shāp′nōt′)
n.
A traditional style of unaccompanied group singing using a sol-fa notation in which the shape of the note indicates its pitch. Also called shape singing.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Led by Larry Gordon, Northern Harmony's 14 brilliant young singers' programme will include South African songs and dances, traditional polyphony from Georgia, Corsica and the Balkans, American shape-note singing and quartet gospel, as well as renaissance motets.
Led by Larry Gordon, Northern Harmony's 14 young singers present a thrilling mix of world harmony traditions including South African songs and dances, traditional polyphony from Georgia, Corsica and the Balkans, American shape-note singing and quartet gospel.
The three Aboriginal Alaskan selections are in the High Church Protestant style; beginning with Lord I call to Blessed Be They Name with Having Beheld the Resurrection in the middle; the language is Yup'ik; the music a Shape-Note singing X close harmony hybrid.
Schor detected the strains of Shaker shape-note singing.
In fact, in my experience, many people today believe shape-note singing and Sacred Harp singing are synonymous; for them there is no other shape-note music.
Hope Abbey Mausoleum will be open to the public again on Thursday, when the Eugene Sacred Harp Singers perform a free concert of 19th century American shape-note singing inside the resonant building.
Sacred Harp is a style of singing, also known as fasola or shape-note singing.
I would like to hear from anyone who composes hymns, both lyrics and music, in the traditional mode of early American hymnody (also known as shape-note singing).
Kieffer, Ephraim Ruebush, and Anthony Johnson Showalter who not only ran shape-note singing schools but also published the books to be used.
I find this extremely dubious both on musical grounds and because the shape-note singing tradition was established in the deep South, and never in the Appalachian mountains, where hymn singing was largely 'Primitive Baptist'--highly decorated, led by a precentor, monophonic, identical in every aspect but language to the Gaelic psalm singing of the Hebrides.
Today, Wright practices shape-note singing and sometimes attends his wife's Catholic church.
Some trace its roots back to 19th-century shape-note singing in the South, although Powell insists that its history goes back no farther than the Jesus movement of the late 1960s.