teeth

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teeth

 (tēth)
n.
Plural of tooth.

teeth

(tiːθ)
n
1. (Dentistry) the plural of tooth
2. the most violent part: the teeth of the gale.
3. the power to produce a desired effect: that law has no teeth.
4. by the skin of one's teeth See skin14
5. get one's teeth into to become engrossed in
6. in the teeth of in direct opposition to; against: in the teeth of violent criticism he went ahead with his plan.
7. show one's teeth to threaten, esp in a defensive manner
8. to the teeth to the greatest possible degree: armed to the teeth.

tooth

(tuθ)

n., pl. teeth, (ˈtu θɪŋ, -ðɪŋ) n.
1. (in most vertebrates) one of the hard bodies or processes usu. attached in a row to each jaw, serving for the prehension and mastication of food, as weapons of attack or defense, etc., and in mammals typically composed chiefly of dentin surrounding a sensitive pulp and covered on the crown with enamel.
2. (in invertebrates) any of various similar or analogous processes occurring in the mouth or alimentary canal, or on a shell.
3. any projection resembling a tooth.
4. one of the projections of a comb, rake, saw, etc.
5.
a. any of the uniform projections on a gear or rack by which it drives or is driven by a gear, rack, or worm.
b. any of the uniform projections on a sprocket by which it drives or is driven by a chain.
6. Bot. any small, toothlike marginal lobe.
7. a sharp, distressing, or destructive attribute or agency.
8. taste, relish, or liking.
9. teeth, effective power, esp. to enforce or accomplish something: to put teeth into a law.
10. a roughened surface, as on a sharpening stone, grinding wheel, or drawing paper.
v.t.
11. to furnish with teeth.
v.i.
12. to interlock, as cogwheels.
Idioms:
1. in the teeth of, straight into, against, or in defiance of.
2. long in the tooth, noticeably old; elderly.
3. set one's teeth, to become resolute; prepare for difficulty.
4. show one's teeth, to become menacing; reveal one's hostility.
5. to the teeth, to the fullest extent; fully; entirely: armed to the teeth.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English tōth, c. Old Frisian tōth, Old Saxon tand, Old High German zan(t), Old Norse tǫnn; akin to Gothic tunthus, Latin dēns, Greek odoús, Skt dánta]

Teeth

See also anatomy; body, human.

the condition of having teeth without roots attached to the alveolar ridge of the jaws, as in certain animals. — acrodont, adj.
the habit of purposelessly grinding one’s teeth, especially during sleep. Also called bruxomania.
the condition of being decayed or carious, especially with regard to teeth.
the shedding of teeth.
the production or cutting of teeth; teething. Also called odontogeny.
odontology.
the branch of dentistry concerned with diseases of the dental pulp and removal of the dental pulp, the nerve and other tissue of the pulp cavity; root canal therapy. Also endodontology. — endodontist, n.
endodontics.
the branch of dentistry concerned with the extraction of teeth. — exodontist, n.
a condition of the teeth in which they become loose, especially the molars.
dentition. — odontogenic, adj.
a treatise describing or giving the history of teeth. — odontographic, adj.
1. the science that studies teeth and their surrounding tissues, especially the prevention and cure of their diseases.
2. dentistry. Also called dentology. — odontologist, n.odontological, adj.
an abnormal fear of teeth, especially of animal teeth.
the branch of dentistry that studies the prevention and correction of irregular teeth. — orthodontist, n.orthodontic, adj.
the branch of dentistry that studies and treats disease of the bone, connecting tissue, and gum surrounding a tooth. — periodontist, n. — periodontic, adj.
preventive dentistry. — prophylactodontist, n. — prophylactodontic, adj.
the branch of dentistry concerned with the replacement of missing teeth with dentures, bridges, etc. — prosthodontist, n.
a shrinking or wasting away of the gums.

Teeth

 
  1. Beautiful teeth, like china plates —Rosellen Brown
  2. Big teeth … like chunks of solidified milk —Frank Swinnerton
  3. Front teeth showed like those of a squirrel —George Ade
  4. (When she opened her mouth) gaps like broken window panes could be seen in her teeth —Sholem Asch
  5. Her front teeth overlapped each other like dealt cards —Alice McDermott
  6. His teeth looked like a picket fence in a slum neighborhood —Stephen King
  7. His [false] teeth moved slightly, like the keyboards of a piano —Pamela Hansford Johnson
  8. His teeth stood out like scored corks set in a jagged row —Sterling Hayden
  9. Lower teeth crooked, as if some giant had taken his face and squeezed them loose from his jaw —Larry McMurtry
  10. My teeth felt like they had little sweaters on them —Anon

    See Also: TASTE

  11. Sharp-worn teeth like slivers of rock —Ella Leffland
  12. The shiny new false teeth gave him the peculiar look of someone who smiles for a living —Andrew Kaplan
  13. Small pointed teeth, like a squirrel’s —Willa Cather
  14. Teeth all awry and at all angles like an old fence —George Garrett
  15. Teeth, as yellow as old ivory —Frank Swinnerton
  16. Teeth … big and even as piano keys —Helen Hudson
  17. Teeth … channelled and stained like the teeth of an old horse —R. Wright Campbell
  18. Teeth … chattering like castanets —Maurice Edelman
  19. Teeth clatter like ice cubes in a blender —Ira Wood
  20. Teeth clicking like dice —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  21. Teeth like cream —Willa Cather
  22. Teeth like a row of alabaster Britannicas —Joe Coomer
  23. Teeth like pearls —Robert Browning
  24. Teeth like piano keys —Elizabeth Spencer
  25. Teeth like white mosaics shone —Herbert Read
  26. Teeth … tapping together like typewriter keys —Cornell Woolrich
  27. White teeth, the kind that look like cheap dentures even when they are not —Eric Ambler

teeth

Up to 32 bone-like structures in the jaws. Different types (incisors, canines, premolars, molars) are specialized to pierce, tear, crush, and/or grind food.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.teeth - the kind and number and arrangement of teeth (collectively) in a person or animalteeth - the kind and number and arrangement of teeth (collectively) in a person or animal
primary dentition - dentition of deciduous teeth
secondary dentition - dentition of permanent teeth
tooth - hard bonelike structures in the jaws of vertebrates; used for biting and chewing or for attack and defense
mouth, oral cavity, oral fissure, rima oris - the opening through which food is taken in and vocalizations emerge; "he stuffed his mouth with candy"
set - a group of things of the same kind that belong together and are so used; "a set of books"; "a set of golf clubs"; "a set of teeth"

teeth

plural noun see teeth
Translations
zobje

teeth

n., pl. dientes;
deciduous ______ de leche o primera dentición;
permanent ______ permanentes;
secondary ______ secundarios;
wisdom ______ cordales
pop. muelas del juicio.

teeth

pl de tooth
References in classic literature ?
The Sheep, much against his will, carried her backward and forward for a long time, and at last said, "If you had treated a dog in this way, you would have had your deserts from his sharp teeth.
Occasionally a solitary male was driven out by the sharp teeth of his rivals.
And as he rolled, and felt sharp teeth pricking him, he snapped and snarled, alternating snarls with whimperings and squallings of terror, pain, and abject humility.
Billee wagged his tail appeasingly, turned to run when he saw that appeasement was of no avail, and cried (still appeasingly) when Spitz's sharp teeth scored his flank.
There was a deliberate voluptuousness which was both thrilling and repulsive, and as she arched her neck she actually licked her lips like an animal, till I could see in the moonlight the moisture shining on the scarlet lips and on the red tongue as it lapped the white sharp teeth.
The native, first placing a calabash beneath the nose, as it were, of his curious-looking log-steed, for the purpose of receiving the grated fragments as they fall, mounts astride of it as if it were a hobby-horse, and twirling the inside of his hemispheres of cocoanut around the sharp teeth of the mother-of-pearl shell, the pure white meat falls in snowy showers into the receptacle provided.
But both the Lion and Tiger snarled so fiercely and bared their strong, sharp teeth so threateningly, that the men drew back in alarm.
Each soldier was armed with a wooden sword having an edge of sharp teeth set in a row, and the sight of these teeth at first caused Dorothy to shudder.
The beast was quite dead from the sword thrusts, and after a glance at its terrible claws and sharp teeth the little man turned in a panic and rushed out upon the water, for other menacing growls told him more bears were near.
The crocodile is very ugly, having no proportion between his length and thickness; he hath short feet, a wide mouth, with two rows of sharp teeth, standing wide from each other, a brown skin so fortified with scales, even to his nose, that a musket-ball cannot penetrate it.
They had long legs and fierce eyes and sharp teeth.
The bat makes an opening in the skin with its sharp teeth and proceeds to extract the blood.