shawl

(redirected from shawled)
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shawl

 (shôl)
n.
A usually square, rectangular, or triangular piece of cloth worn as a covering for the head, neck, or shoulders.
tr.v. shawled, shawl·ing, shawls
To cover with or as if with such a piece of cloth.

[Persian shāl, ultimately from Sanskrit śāṭī, cloth, sari.]

shawl

(ʃɔːl)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a piece of fabric or knitted or crocheted material worn around the shoulders by women or wrapped around a baby
[C17: from Persian shāl]

shawl

(ʃɔl)

n.
a piece of wool or other fabric worn, esp. by women, about the shoulders and sometimes the head, for warmth or for style.
[1655–65;< Persian shāl]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shawl - cloak consisting of an oblong piece of cloth used to cover the head and shouldersshawl - cloak consisting of an oblong piece of cloth used to cover the head and shoulders
cloak - a loose outer garment
prayer shawl, tallith, tallis - (Judaism) a shawl with a ritually knotted fringe at each corner; worn by Jews at morning prayer
sarape, serape - a long brightly colored shawl; worn mainly by Mexican men

shawl

noun
A garment wrapped about a person:
Translations
شالشال، وِشاح
šálšátek
sjal
hartiahuivišaali
šal
kendőnagykendővállkendõvállkendő
sjal
ショール
plecu šalle
șal
veľká šatka
šal
sjal
ผ้าคลุมไหล่
khăn choàng

shawl

[ʃɔːl] Nchal m, rebozo m (LAm)

shawl

[ˈʃɔːl] n (= garment) → châle m

shawl

n (round shoulders) → (Umhänge)tuch nt; (tailored) → Umhang m; (covering head) → (Kopf)tuch nt

shawl

[ʃɔːl] nscialle m

shawl

(ʃoːl) noun
a piece of fabric used as a covering for the shoulders etc.

shawl

شال šál sjal Schultertuch σάλι chal hartiahuivi châle šal scialle ショール sjaal sjal szal xaile, xale шаль sjal ผ้าคลุมไหล่ şal khăn choàng 披肩
References in classic literature ?
But, he had not gone the length of three streets, when he saw another of the shawled figures in advance of him, at which he looked so keenly that perhaps its mere shadow indistinctly reflected on the wet pavement - if he could have seen it without the figure itself moving along from lamp to lamp, brightening and fading as it went - would have been enough to tell him who was there.
Besides their hostess and her sister, they found, in the long chilly drawing-room, only another shawled lady, a genial Vicar who was her husband, a silent lad whom Mrs.