she'd


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she'd

 (shēd)
1. Contraction of she had.
2. Contraction of she would.

she'd

(ʃiːd)
contraction of
she had or she would

shed1

(ʃɛd)

n.
1. a slight or rude structure built for shelter, storage, etc.
2. a large, strongly built structure, often open at the sides or end.
[1475–85; appar. variant, orig. dial., of shade]
shed′like`, adj.

shed2

(ʃɛd)

v. shed, shed•ding,
n. v.t.
1. to pour forth; let fall: to shed tears.
2. to give or send forth (light, influence, etc.).
3. to resist being penetrated or affected by: cloth that sheds water.
4. to cast off or lose (leaves, skin, etc.) by natural process.
5. Textiles. to separate (the warp) in forming a shed.
v.i.
6. to fall off, as leaves.
7. to drop out, as hair or grain.
8. to cast off hair, skin, or other covering or parts by natural process.
n.
9. Textiles. (on a loom) a triangular, transverse opening created between raised and lowered warp threads through which the shuttle passes in depositing the loose pick.
[before 950; (v.), Old English scēadan, variant of sceādan, c. Old Frisian skētha, Old High German sceidan, Gothic skaidan to separate]
shed′a•ble, shed′da•ble, adj.

she'd

(ʃid)
1. contraction of she had.
2. contraction of she would.
References in classic literature ?
Then she'd laugh and slow down for a little, but she'd soon forget and begin to pedal and sing again.
She used ter be real handsome--and she would be now, if she'd let herself be.
I'D a heard her if she'd a said it to herself, let alone speaking it out; and I'd a got up and obeyed her if I'd a been dead.
She's cranky an' she's sour; I should think she'd ben nussed on bonny-clabber an' green apples.
She'd a pretty thick veil on, sir, but she raised it to pay me, and I should say she'd been crying.
On the way she told me about the Martha, and how she'd bought her, and was going to float her.
Lynde was awful mad when I said that and shut the Bible up and said she'd never read me any more of it if I talked like that.
I do wish she'd lived long enough for me to remember calling her mother.
He should a been wed afore, to a widow lady, but they couldn't agree over the money: she'd a rare long purse, and Mr.
And as to that Betty as was dairymaid at Trent's before she come to me, she'd ha' left the cheeses without turning from week's end to week's end, and the dairy thralls, I might ha' wrote my name on 'em, when I come downstairs after my illness, as the doctor said it was inflammation--it was a mercy I got well of it.
I thought she'd be real old-fashioned, but her clothes aren't too bad at all.
Because if he'd had one she'd a burnt him out herself