she'll


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she'll

 (shēl)
Contraction of she will.

she'll

(ʃiːl; unstressed ʃɪl)
contraction of
she will or she shall

shell

(ʃɛl)

n.
1. a hard outer covering of an animal, as of a clam, snail, lobster, or turtle.
2. the material constituting any of various coverings of this kind.
3. the hard exterior of an egg.
4. the usu. hard outer covering of a seed, fruit, or the like.
5. something resembling the shell of an animal, as in shape or hollowness.
6. a hard, protecting or enclosing case or cover.
7. a reserved attitude or manner.
8. a hollow projectile, as for a cannon, filled with an explosive charge.
9. a metallic cartridge used in small arms.
10. a metal or paper cartridge for use in a shotgun.
11. a cartridgelike pyrotechnic device that explodes in the air.
12. an unfilled pastry crust, as for a pie.
13. a light, long, narrow racing boat for rowing by one or more persons.
14. the framework or external structure of a building.
15. the outer part of a finished garment that has an often detachable lining.
16. a woman's sleeveless blouse or sweater.
17. the plating or planking forming the exterior hull of a ship.
18. a computer program providing a menu-driven or graphical user interface designed to simplify use of the operating system, as in loading application programs.
19.
a. any of the electron orbits in an atom having the same principal quantum number and about the same energy.
b. a group of nucleons of approximately the same energy.
21. the curved solid forming a domed or arched roof.
22. the metal, pressure-resistant outer casing of a fire-tube boiler.
v.t.
23. to remove the shell of.
24. to separate (corn, grain, etc.) from the ear, cob, or husk.
25. to fire shells or explosive projectiles into, upon, or among; bombard.
v.i.
26. to fall or come out of the shell, husk, or pod.
27. to come away or fall off, as a shell or outer coat.
28. to gather seashells.
29. shell out, Informal. to pay (money).
[before 900; (n.) Old English scell (Anglian), sciell, c. Middle Dutch schelle pod, rind, Old Norse skel seashell, Gothic skalja tile]
shell′-less, adj.

she'll

(ʃil; unstressed ʃɪl)
contraction of she will.
References in classic literature ?
Aye, she'll git tired of deh life atter a while an' den she'll wanna be a-comin' home, won' she, deh beast
She'll have Hannah's shoes and John's undershirts and Mark's socks most likely.
For she'll get busier and mischievouser every day--she will, bless her.
I wonder what she'll think about the mystery of Golden Milestone," remarked Felicity.
I guess she thought such a handsome young husband was worth all 'at ever she had, and he might take it and welcome, but I lay she'll rue her bargain afore long.
I suppose she has lost it and is afraid to own up for fear she'll be punished.
In a year I buy her free again; she'll keep that in mind, and it'll reconcile her.
Why, she'll rush out more dead than alive just in the things she is wearing; if you delay at all there'll be tears and 'Papa' and 'Mamma,' and she's frozen in a minute and must go back- but you wrap the fur cloak round her first thing and carry her to the sleigh.
Flora has now her grievance, and she'll work it to the end.
Yes, an' if she'll come around ag'in in 'bout an' hour she'll git a pile more.
She'll never again think me anything but a paltry pretence-- too nice to take heaven except upon flattering conditions, and yet selling myself for any devil's change by the sly.
But he's going to see a skinny old maid in Millersville now, and I guess she'll take him fast enough.