sheave


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sheave 1

 (shēv)
tr.v. sheaved, sheav·ing, sheaves
To collect and bind into a sheaf.

[From sheaf.]

sheave 2

 (shēv, shĭv)
n.
A wheel or disk with a grooved rim, especially one used as a pulley.

[Middle English sheve; see skei- in Indo-European roots.]

sheave

(ʃiːv)
vb
(tr) to gather or bind into sheaves

sheave

(ʃiːv)
n
(Mechanical Engineering) a wheel with a grooved rim, esp one used as a pulley
[C14: of Germanic origin; compare Old High German scība disc]

sheave1

(ʃiv)

v.t. sheaved, sheav•ing.
to gather, collect, or bind into a sheaf or sheaves.
[1570–80; derivative of sheaf]

sheave2

(ʃɪv, ʃiv)

n.
1. a pulley for hoisting or hauling, having a grooved rim for retaining a rope or wire.
2. a wheel with a grooved rim, for transmitting force to a cable or belt.
[1300–50]

sheave


Past participle: sheaved
Gerund: sheaving

Imperative
sheave
sheave
Present
I sheave
you sheave
he/she/it sheaves
we sheave
you sheave
they sheave
Preterite
I sheaved
you sheaved
he/she/it sheaved
we sheaved
you sheaved
they sheaved
Present Continuous
I am sheaving
you are sheaving
he/she/it is sheaving
we are sheaving
you are sheaving
they are sheaving
Present Perfect
I have sheaved
you have sheaved
he/she/it has sheaved
we have sheaved
you have sheaved
they have sheaved
Past Continuous
I was sheaving
you were sheaving
he/she/it was sheaving
we were sheaving
you were sheaving
they were sheaving
Past Perfect
I had sheaved
you had sheaved
he/she/it had sheaved
we had sheaved
you had sheaved
they had sheaved
Future
I will sheave
you will sheave
he/she/it will sheave
we will sheave
you will sheave
they will sheave
Future Perfect
I will have sheaved
you will have sheaved
he/she/it will have sheaved
we will have sheaved
you will have sheaved
they will have sheaved
Future Continuous
I will be sheaving
you will be sheaving
he/she/it will be sheaving
we will be sheaving
you will be sheaving
they will be sheaving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sheaving
you have been sheaving
he/she/it has been sheaving
we have been sheaving
you have been sheaving
they have been sheaving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sheaving
you will have been sheaving
he/she/it will have been sheaving
we will have been sheaving
you will have been sheaving
they will have been sheaving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sheaving
you had been sheaving
he/she/it had been sheaving
we had been sheaving
you had been sheaving
they had been sheaving
Conditional
I would sheave
you would sheave
he/she/it would sheave
we would sheave
you would sheave
they would sheave
Past Conditional
I would have sheaved
you would have sheaved
he/she/it would have sheaved
we would have sheaved
you would have sheaved
they would have sheaved
References in classic literature ?
One end of the long structure was full of corn; the middle was where the reed-drawing was carried on, and there had already been placed in the reed-press the evening before as many sheaves of wheat as would be sufficient for the women to draw from during the day.
All through the wheat season, she told us, Ambrosch hired his sister out like a man, and she went from farm to farm, binding sheaves or working with the threshers.
Towards the stern of the boat it is spirally coiled away in the tub, not like the worm-pipe of a still though, but so as to form one round, cheese-shaped mass of densely bedded sheaves, or layers of concentric spiralizations, without any hollow but the heart, or minute vertical tube formed at the axis of the cheese.
Too, the blue ribbons had been restored to the curtains, and the lambrequin, with its immense sheaves of yellow wheat and red roses of equal size, had been returned, in a worn and sorry state, to its position at the mantel.
With tools made of these flints, they likewise cut their hay, and reap their oats, which there grow naturally in several fields; the YAHOOS draw home the sheaves in carriages, and the servants tread them in certain covered huts to get out the grain, which is kept in stores.
And therein they saw, placed apart, an hundred and forty stout yew bows of cunning make, with fine waxen silk strings; and an hundred and forty sheaves of arrows.
But as for the proposal made by Levin--to take a part as shareholder with his laborers in each agricultural undertaking-- at this the bailiff simply expressed a profound despondency, and offered no definite opinion, but began immediately talking of the urgent necessity of carrying the remaining sheaves of rye the next day, and of sending the men out for the second ploughing, so that Levin felt that this was not the time for discussing it.
With a perfectly breath-taking suddenness several mast sheaves of varicolored rockets were vomited skyward out of the black throats of the Castle towers, accompanied by a thundering crash of sound, and instantly every detail of the prodigious ruin stood revealed against the mountainside and glowing with an almost intolerable splendor of fire and color.
Linton and his daughter would frequently walk out among the reapers; at the carrying of the last sheaves they stayed till dusk, and the evening happening to be chill and damp, my master caught a bad cold, that settled obstinately on his lungs, and confined him indoors throughout the whole of the winter, nearly without intermission.
Petersburg it was autumn--a season when, in the country, the weather is clear and keen and bright, all agricultural labour has come to an end, the great sheaves of corn are safely garnered in the byre, and the birds are flying hither and thither in clamorous flocks.
As Fouquet was giving, or appearing to give, all his attention to the brilliant illuminations, the languishing music of the violins and hautboys, the sparkling sheaves of the artificial fires, which, inflaming the heavens with glowing reflections, marked behind the trees the dark profile of the donjon of Vincennes; as, we say, the superintendent was smiling on the ladies and the poets the fete was every whit as gay as usual; and Vatel, whose restless, even jealous look, earnestly consulted the aspect of Fouquet, did not appear dissatisfied with the welcome given to the ordering of the evening's entertainment.
The sounds of crackling and the din of falling walls and ceilings, the whistle and hiss of the flames, the excited shouts of the people, and the sight of the swaying smoke, now gathering into thick black clouds and now soaring up with glittering sparks, with here and there dense sheaves of flame (now red and now like golden fish scales creeping along the walls), and the heat and smoke and rapidity of motion, produced on Pierre the usual animating effects of a conflagration.