sheepfold


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sheep·fold

 (shēp′fōld′)
n.
A pen for sheep.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sheepfold

(ˈʃiːpˌfəʊld)
n
(Agriculture) a pen or enclosure for sheep
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sheep•fold

(ˈʃipˌfoʊld)

n.
Chiefly Brit. an enclosure for sheep.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sheepfold - a pen for sheepsheepfold - a pen for sheep      
pen - an enclosure for confining livestock
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

sheepfold

[ˈʃiːpfəʊld] Nredil m, aprisco m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

sheepfold

[ˈʃiːpˌfəʊld] novile m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
It would not be safe to admit him to the sheepfold."
Yes, here were a set of sea-dogs, many of whom without the slightest bashfulness had boarded great whales on the high seas --entire strangers to them --and duelled them dead without winking; and yet, here they sat at a social breakfast table --all of the same calling, all of kindred tastes --looking round as sheepishly at each other as though they had never been out of sight of some sheepfold among the Green Mountains.
"Egad," said Sancho, "but that sort of life squares, nay corners, with my notions; and what is more the bachelor Samson Carrasco and Master Nicholas the barber won't have well seen it before they'll want to follow it and turn shepherds along with us; and God grant it may not come into the curate's head to join the sheepfold too, he's so jovial and fond of enjoying himself."
``By the crook of St Dunstan,'' said that worthy ecclesiastic, ``which hath brought more sheep within the sheepfold than the crook of e'er another saint in Paradise, I swear that I cannot expound unto you this jargon, which, whether it be French or Arabic, is beyond my guess.''
Witness, too, all human beings, how when herded together in the sheepfold of a theatre's pit, they will, at the slightest alarm of fire, rush helter-skelter for the outlets, crowding, trampling, jamming, and remorselessly dashing each other to death.
She thought she could walk back across the field, and get over the stile; and then, in the very next field, she thought she remembered there was a hovel of furze near a sheepfold. If she could get into that hovel, she would be warmer.
Not in a day nor a generation were the ravaged sheepfolds to be forgotten.
The god wrought also a pasture in a fair mountain dell, and a large flock of sheep, with a homestead and huts, and sheltered sheepfolds.
Barns, sheepfolds, stables, cowsheds, and other buildings lay on either side, and in the midst was the great pool where the manure had been laid to rot.
In old local dialect the word is a name for a sheepfold (presumably from the Welsh 'dafad' - sheep, and 'ty' - house).
13In John, the sheepfold represents the gathering of Jesus' disciples and of later believers.