wares

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ware 1

 (wâr)
n.
1. An item that is offered for sale.
2. An attribute or ability, especially when regarded as an article of commerce: "Mathewson had displayed impressive wares with his fastball, big overhand curve and baffling 'fadeaway' (today known as a screwball)" (Stuart Miller).

[Middle English, from Old English waru, goods; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

ware 2

 (wâr) Archaic
tr.v. wared, war·ing, wares
To beware of.
adj.
1. Watchful; wary.
2. Aware.

[Middle English waren, from Old English warian; see wer- in Indo-European roots. Adj., Middle English; see wary.]

wares

(wɛəz)
pl n
1. (Commerce) articles of manufacture considered as being for sale
2. (Commerce) any talent or asset regarded as a commercial or saleable commodity
3. (Ceramics) (Caribbean) earthenware
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

wares

plural noun goods, produce, stock, products, stuff, commodities, merchandise, lines Vendors displayed their wares in baskets on the ground.
Translations
أدوات، آنِيَه
varer
söluvara

wares

[wɛəz] NPLmercancías fpl
to cry one's warespregonar sus mercancías

wares

[ˈwɛərz] nplmarchandises fpl
to sell one's wares → vendre ses marchandises

wares

plWaren pl; to cry one’s wares (dated)seine Waren anpreisen

wares

[wɛəz] nplmerci fpl

-ware

(weə)
manufactured articles (made of a particular material). silverware/glassware.
wares noun plural
articles for sale. a tradesman selling his wares.
warehouse noun
a building in which goods are stored. a furniture warehouse.
References in periodicals archive ?
* Poor interaction design may turn software into shelfware.
No one wants to pay for shelfware. No one ever wanted to.
The typical enterprise has between six and 10 monitoring and troubleshooting tools in active use, and with even more shelfware. These tools are not integrated and they typically focus on establishing the innocence of a particular technology domain.
"A lot of smartwatches out there end up being shelfware."
Massive shelfware. Legacy analyst firms require their clients to purchase a minimum of reader and subscriber seats to research often in the tens of thousands wasted in order to access analysts.
These products then become ''shelfware'' - boxed and kept on a shelf.
Many incorrectly believe that issues of shelfware (buying too much software) and non-compliant software use (and the resulting software audit penalties) disappear by moving to a subscription model.
In addition, "these customers have a lot of shelfware," he said.
One big potential area of savings is making sure you're not getting over-licensed, whether it be in terms of unnecessary modules, too many users or other instances of shelfware that turn out to be the equivalent of throwing away money.
Purchased but unused software licenses that sit on your closet shelf is where the concept of "shelfware" originated: There is no "shelfware" in the cloud where you pay for what you use.
Equally, if not more importantly, firms should obtain manager/ user buy-in for BI and provide adequate training to avoid it from becoming costly shelfware. One step to take is to select metrics and KPIs that are aligned with business goals, recommends McElroy.
Once the software has been acquired, it can be difficult to transfer licences to different departments, buy more licences quickly to meet the demands of a specific project, track what has been spent or avoid wasting resources by paying for what ultimately becomes 'shelfware'.