shellfishery

shell·fish·er·y

 (shĕl′fĭsh′ə-rē)
n. pl. shell·fish·er·ies
1. The industry or occupation of catching, processing, or selling shellfish.
2. A fishing ground for shellfish.

shellfishery

(ˈʃɛlˌfɪʃərɪ)
npl -ries
1. the shellfishing industry
2. a place for fishing shellfish
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, chronic perturbations associated with continued human population growth and development in urban and suburban watersheds are expected to accelerate declines in shellfishery yields through the effects of nutrient loading and other disturbances (Kennish 2002).
For example, beach and shellfishery closures in Washington State occur when fecal coliform levels exceed a geometric mean of 14 colony forming units (CFUs) or enterococci levels exceed a geometric mean of 70 CFU/100 mL marine water (State of Washington 2014).
The workshop's 22 participants are from 10 different countries and represent disciplines including clinical and aquatic microbiology, hygiene and public health, food safety, and bivalve shellfishery management.
For example, a study featured in the book discusses how the decimation of great sharks in the mid-Atlantic ocean off the coast of the United States may be linked to the collapse of a once-important shellfishery.
Included in the articles of separation were the rights to the shellfishery of either Eastham or Orleans to be retained by the inhabitants of the other as if they were residents of that town.
federal court ruling on shellfishery management in Washington's coastal marine waters (Shellfish Subproceedings of United States vs.
The hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) once supported a major commercial shellfishery in Barnegat Bay (Hillman and Kennish, 1984).
This increase in shellfish cultivation is most apparent in developing countries, where environmental legislation and protection of the wider shellfishery environment is currently lacking, and where contamination of marine waters from sewage and agricultural runoff is particularly problematic (Oliveira et al.
The person who tackles a job of shellfishery enhancement faces a myriad of problems in shellfish ecology, technology, and social phenomena for which little training or guidance exists.
The useful information obtained from this study can he applied in shellfishery management.
Policy failure and stakeholder dissatisfaction in complex ecosystem management: the case of the Dutch Wadden Sea shellfishery.
These data may be of use by shellfishery resource managers in making decisions about programs designed to increase shellfishery production by either thinning populations of quahogs in dense assemblages in coves and/or maintaining transplant sites in open waters to act as spawner sanctuaries.