shepherdess

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Related to Shepherdesses: shepherding

shep·herd·ess

 (shĕp′ər-dĭs)
n.
A girl or woman who herds, guards, and tends sheep.

shepherdess

(ˈʃɛpədɛs)
n
(Agriculture) a woman employed to tend sheep

shep•herd•ess

(ˈʃɛp ər dɪs)

n.
a girl or woman who herds sheep.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shepherdess - a woman shepherdshepherdess - a woman shepherd      
sheepherder, sheepman, shepherd - a herder of sheep (on an open range); someone who keeps the sheep together in a flock
Translations
pastirica

shepherdess

[ˈʃepədɪs] Npastora f, zagala f

shepherdess

[ˈʃɛpərdɛs] nbergère fshepherd's pie n (British)hachis m Parmentier

shepherdess

nSchäferin f

shepherdess

[ˈʃɛpədɪs] npastorella
References in classic literature ?
There were milkmaids and shepherdesses, with brightly colored bodices and golden spots all over their gowns; and princesses with most gorgeous frocks of silver and gold and purple; and shepherds dressed in knee breeches with pink and yellow and blue stripes down them, and golden buckles on their shoes; and princes with jeweled crowns upon their heads, wearing ermine robes and satin doublets; and funny clowns in ruffled gowns, with round red spots upon their cheeks and tall, pointed caps.
There were such portentous shepherdesses among the Ladies Dedlock dead and gone, he told us, that peaceful crooks became weapons of assault in their hands.
The "old blue" that we hang about our walls as ornaments were the common every-day household utensils of a few centuries ago; and the pink shepherds and the yellow shepherdesses that we hand round now for all our friends to gush over, and pretend they understand, were the unvalued mantel-ornaments that the mother of the eighteenth century would have given the baby to suck when he cried.
They consisted of a box for cards, of splendid workmanship, a bright-blue Sevres tea cup with shepherdesses depicted on it and with a lid, and a gold snuffbox with the count's portrait on the lid which Pierre had had done by a miniaturist in Petersburg.
All the books and pictures, even the chairs and tables, had belonged to him, or had reference to him; even the china dogs on the mantelpiece and the little shepherdesses with their sheep had been bought by him for a penny a piece from a man who used to stand with a tray of toys in Kensington High Street, as Katharine had often heard her mother tell.
If the truth must be told, I did not like his best things at first, but long remained chiefly attached to his rubbishing pastorals, which I was perpetually imitating, with a whole apparatus of swains and shepherdesses, purling brooks, enamelled meads, rolling years, and the like.